Lunch with the Leaders

A tradition at the SRCD Biennial Meeting is the "Lunch with the Leaders" that provides a forum for students to interact with senior scholars who have central roles in the field of child development and the Society. Five students may reserve a seat to share lunch conversation with each leader. Approximately three weeks in advance of the Biennial Meeting, each person receives an introductory email message from the leader of his/her assigned table. We invite each young scholar to send one or two questions to the leader before the meeting and to exchange email correspondence with others who will be seated at his/her table.  

Friday, April 7, 2017


Lunch with the Leaders

Friday April 17, 2017 from 12:15 pm - 1:45 pm, Governor's Ballroom C (Hilton Austin, 4th Floor)

NOTE: To attend this event, you must register for the 2017 SRCD Biennial Meeting and currently be a student. Only one ticket per participant; you may not attend both lunches.

Adriana Umana-Taylor  Andrew Fuligni Ariel Kalil Bridget Hamre Carol Martin
Charissa Cheah Eleanor Seaton Jeanne Brooks-Gunn Kathy Hirsh-Pasek Natasha Cabrera
Noelle Hurd Richard Fabes Sam Putnam Sheri Bauman Tama Leventhal
Xinyin Chen Robert Lickliter Deborah Rivas-Drake Jennifer Lansford Kimberly Updegraff

Saturday, April 8, 2011


Lunch with the Leaders

Saturday April 8, 2017 from 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm, Governor's Ballroom C (Hilton Austin, 4th Floor)

NOTE: To attend this event, you must register for the 2017 SRCD Biennial Meeting and currently be a student. Only one ticket per participant, you may not attend both lunches.

Susanne Denham Carol Worthman Cynthia García Coll David K. Dickinson Deborah Phillips
Dorothy Espelage Frosso Motti Hirokazu Yoshikawa Martha Ann Bell Mary Gauvain
Michael Cunningham Nancy C. Jordan Nora Newcombe Robert Bradley Roberta Michnick Golinkoff
Sandy Calvert Seth Pollak Stacey Horn Thomas Dishion Sandra Graham

Biographies 


Friday's Lunch 


Adriana Umana-Taylor Dr. Umaña-Taylor’s research focuses on youths’ experiences with culturally informed risk and protective factors during adolescence. Her work has focused on understanding ethnic-racial identity development and its links to adjustment during the developmental period of adolescence. She also has made significant contributions to understanding familial ethnic socialization processes among Latino families in the U.S., as well as demonstrating the vast diversity that exists among Latino populations in the U.S. In her most recent work, she developed and tested the efficacy of a health promotion intervention designed to increase adolescents’ ethnic-racial identity exploration and resolution.

  • Umaña-Taylor, A. J., Tynes, B., Toomey, R. B., Williams, D., & Mitchell, K. (2015). Latino adolescents’ perceived discrimination in online and off-line settings: An examination of cultural risk and protective factors. Developmental Psychology, 51, 87-100. doi:10.1037/a0038432
  • Umaña-Taylor, A. J., Quintana, S. M., Lee, R. M., Cross, W. E., Rivas-Drake, D., Schwartz, S. J., Syed, M., Yip, T., Seaton, E., & Study Group on Ethnic and Racial Identity in the 21st Century (2014). Ethnic and Racial Identity During Adolescence and Into Young Adulthood: An Integrated Conceptualization. Child Development, 85, 21-39. doi:10.1111/cdev.12196
  • Umaña-Taylor, A. J., Zeiders, K. H., & Updegraff, K. A. (2013). Family ethnic socialization and ethnic identity: A family-driven, youth-driven, or reciprocal process? Journal of Family Psychology, 27, 137-146. doi:10.1037/a0031105

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Andrew Fuligni, Ph.D., is Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences and the Department of Psychology. He also is a Senior Scientist in the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior. Dr. Fuligni's research focuses on adolescent development among culturally and ethnically diverse populations, with particular attention to teenagers from immigrant Asian and Latin American backgrounds. Receiving his Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology at the University of Michigan, he was a recipient of the American Psychological Association's Boyd McCandless Award for Early Career Contribution to Developmental Psychology, a William T. Grant Faculty Scholars Award, a FIRST award from NICHD, and he is a Fellow in the American Psychological Association and the Association for Psychological Science. Dr. Fuligni currently is an Associate Editor of the journal Child Development.

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Ariel Kalil  is a Professor in the Harris School of Public Policy Studies at the University of Chicago. At Chicago Harris, she directs the Center for Human Potential and Public Policy and co-directs the Behavioral Insights and Parenting Lab. She also holds an appointment as an Adjunct Professor at the University of Stavanger, Norway, in the Department of Business Administration. She is a developmental psychologist who studies economic conditions, parenting, and child development. Her current research examines the historical evolution of income-based gaps in parenting behavior and children’s cognitive and non-cognitive skills. At the Behavioral Insights and Parenting Lab, she is leading a variety of field experiments designed to strengthen parental engagement and child development in low-income families using tools drawn from behavioral economics and neuroscience.

Kalil received her PhD in developmental psychology from the University of Michigan. Before joining the Harris School faculty in 1999, she completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Michigan's National Poverty Center. Kalil has received the William T. Grant Foundation Faculty Scholars Award, the Changing Faces of America's Children Young Scholars Award from the Foundation for Child Development, the National Academy of Education/Spencer Postdoctoral Fellowship, and in 2003 she was the first-ever recipient of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) Award for Early Research Contributions. 

  • Kalil, A., Ziol-Guest, K., Ryan, R., & Markowitz, A. (2016, August). Changes in income-based gaps in parent activities with young children from 1988-2012. AERA Open 2 (3) 2332858416653732; DOI: 10.1177/2332858416653732

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Bridget Hamre, Ph.D. is an Associate Research Professor and Associate Director of the University of Virginia’s Center for Advanced Study of Teaching and Learning (CASTL).  Dr. Hamre’s areas of expertise include student-teacher relationships and classroom processes that promote positive academic and social development for young children and she has authored numerous peer-reviewed manuscripts on these topics.  This work documents the ways in which early teacher-child relationships and teachers' social and instructional interactions with children support children's development and learning and may help close the achievement gap for students at risk of school failure. Dr. Hamre works closely with federal, state, and local early childhood leaders to help bridge the research to practice divide.  She collaborates with the Office of Head Start on their implementation of the Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS™) as a part of the federal monitoring process and consults with numerous states on their Quality Rating and Improvement Systems. She is also leading UVA’s efforts to support the implementation of Virginia’s federal preschool expansion grant. Dr. Hamre received her bachelor’s degree from the University of California, Berkeley and her masters and doctorate in clinical and school psychology from the University of Virginia.

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Carol Martin, Ph.D. is a Cowden Distinguished Professor of Child Development in the School of Social and Family Dynamics at Arizona State University. Her research interests focuses on gender development including the development of gender identity, gender expression and gender attitudes; the development of positive gender relationships; and the role of gender and sex-segregation in school and psychological adjustment. She also studies children's peer networks and how experiences with peers influence children's behavior and thinking and has been involved in the development of interventions to improve children’s social relationships. With Dr. Diane Ruble, she has written chapters on gender typing for the Handbook of Child Psychology, and an article in the Annual Review of Psychology.  Dr. Martin is one of the Directors of the Link Enterprise, which involves a group of researchers and educators interested in exploring research questions related to promoting positive relationships across the lifespan. This research is being used in real world settings: Dr. Martin works with a team of researchers and educators on the Class Links Project, which has as its goal developing a brief intervention to improve relationships among pre-adolescents. Dr. Martin is also part of a School-wide initiative to encourage the scientific study of diversity and inclusion, see https://thesanfordschool.asu.edu/disi

  • Martin, C. L., Andrews, N. C. Z.*, England, D.*, Zosuls, K., & Ruble, D. N. (in press, available online). A dual identity approach for conceptualizing and measuring children’s gender identity. Child Development. 
  • Martin, C. L., Cook, R.*, & Andrews, N. C. Z.* (in press, available online). Reviving androgyny: A modern day perspective on flexibility of gender identity and behavior. Sex Roles
  • Martin, C. L. & Ruble, D. H. (2009/2010). Patterns of gender development. In S. Fiske (Ed.), Annual Review of Psychology, 61, 353-381.

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Charissa S. L. Cheah Ph.D., is a Professor in the Department of Psychology (Applied Developmental Program) at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. Dr. Cheah’s research focuses on how multiple aspects of culture (e.g., values and beliefs, ethnic majority versus minority and immigrant status, the socio-cultural context), impact child and adolescent social, emotional, health, and academic development in the U.S. and globally. Dr. Cheah is the Chair-Elect of the Asian Caucus and serves on the Ethnic and Racial Issues Committee of the SRCD.  She is also an elected member of the Executive Committee and the Membership Committee of the International Society for the Study of Behavioral Development. 

  • Cheah, C. S. L. (2016).  Charting future directions for research on Asian American child development.  [Special issue on Research on Asian American Child Development]. Child Development, 87, 1055 – 1060. DOI: 10.1111/cdev.12580
  • Cheah, C. S. L., Li, J., Zhou, N., Yamamoto, Y., & Leung, C. Y. Y. (2015). Understanding Chinese immigrant and European American mothers’ expressions of warmth. Developmental Psychology, 51, 1802-1811. DOI: 10.1037/a0039855

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Eleanor Seaton, Seaton is a developmental psychologist and her research is guided by three areas of inquiry that explore race among Black youth. The first area explores the measurement of racial discrimination, as well as mediators and moderators for racial discrimination experiences. The second area explores the development and content of racial identity, defined as the attitudes and feelings that Black youth ascribe to their racial group.  The last area probes the complex relation between racial discrimination and racial identity among Black youth.  Dr. Seaton uses approaches embedded in a variety of methodological designs (e.g., daily diary, survey, qualitative) and analytical techniques (e.g., latent class, hierarchical linear modeling).  Dr. Seaton’s recent project was the DERBY (Daily Experiences of Race for Black Youth) study, which included a survey, experiential sampling and qualitative component.  Dr. Seaton’s current projects include the development of a racial discrimination measure for use with African American youth that assesses incidents at the nexus of race and gender, and a pilot project examining cortisol levels using biomarker specimens with daily racial discrimination experiences among African American college students.  Dr. Seaton is a consulting editor for Developmental Psychology and Child Development Perspectives, and most recently served as a consulting editor for Child Development.  Dr. Seaton is also the co-chair for the study group, Ethnic/Racial Identity in the 21st Century.   Dr. Seaton’s recent publications include:

  • Seaton, E.K. & Douglass, S. (2014). School diversity and racial discrimination among African American adolescents.  Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, 20, 156-165. doi:10.1037/a0035322. 
  • Seaton, E.K., Upton, R.D., Gilbert, A.N. & Volpe, V. (2014). A moderated mediation model: Racial discrimination, coping strategies and racial identity among Black adolescents. Child Development, 85, 882 -890.  doi:10.1111/cdev.12122.

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Jeanne Brooks-Gunn is the Virginia and Leonard Marx Professor of Child Development at Columbia University’s Teachers College and the College of Physicians and Surgeons. She also co-directs the National Center for Children and Families, a center devoted to research, policy, and practice. Brooks-Gunn’s specialty is policy-oriented research focusing on family and community influences upon the development of children and youth. She also designs and evaluates interventions aimed at enhancing the lives of children and youth, including home visiting programs for pregnant women and new mothers, early childhood education programs for toddlers and preschoolers, two generation programs for young children and their parents, and after-school programs for older children. Dr. Brooks-Gunn has been the recipient of several honors: the Harvard University Graduate School of Education Alumni Council Award, election into the National Academy of Education, election into the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies; Honorary Doctorate of Science at Northwestern University; Distinguished Contributions to the Public Policy for Children Award from the Society for Research in Child Development; Margaret Mead Fellow Award by the American Academy of Political and Social Science; James McKeen Cattell Fellow Award from the American Psychological Society; Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy Award from the American Psychological Association; and the John P. Hill Award for excellence in theory development and research on adolescents from the Society for Research on Adolescence. 

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Kathy Hirsh-Pasek is the Stanley and Debra Lefkowitz Faculty Fellow in the Department of Psychology at Temple University and a Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution. Her research examines the development of early language and literacy as well as the role of play in learning. With her long-term collaborator, Roberta Golinkoff, she is author of 14 books and hundreds of publications, she is the recipient of the American Psychological Association’s Bronfenbrenner Award, the American Psychological Association’s Award for Distinguished Service to Psychological Science, the Association for Psychological Science James McKeen Cattell Award and the APA Distinguished Lecturer Award. She is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association and the American Psychological Society, is the President of the International Society for Infant Studies and served as the Associate Editor of Child Development . She is on the Steering Committee of the Latin American School for Education, Cognitive Neural Science as well as on the advisory board for Vroom, The Boston Children’s Museum, The Free to Be Initiative and Jumpstart. Her book, Einstein never used Flashcards: How children really learn and why they need to play more and memorize less, (Rodale Books) won the prestigious Books for Better Life Award as the best psychology book in 2003.  Her recent book, Becoming Brilliant: What the science tells us about raising successful children was released with APA Press in 2016.  Kathy received her bachelor’s degree from the University of Pittsburgh and her Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania and is a frequent spokesperson for her field appearing in the NYTimes, npr and in international television outlets.

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Natasha Cabrera Bio coming soon.

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Noelle Hurd has a scholarly background in clinical psychology, public health, and education. She has a primary appointment in the University of Virginia (UVA) Psychology Department (specifically, in the clinical and community psychology areas). She also has an appointment in the Curry School of Education and is a faculty affiliate of the Carter G. Woodson Institute for African American and African Studies at UVA. Her research agenda has primarily focused on the promotion of healthy adolescent development among marginalized youth.  Specifically, her work has focused on identifying opportunities to build on pre-existing strengths in youths’ lives, such as supportive intergenerational relationships. Using a resilience framework, she has assessed the potential of nonparental adults to serve as resources to marginalized youth, and she has investigated the processes through which these relationships affect a variety of youth outcomes (e.g., psychological distress, health-risk behaviors, academic achievement). Currently, she is investigating the role of contextual factors in promoting or deterring the formation of intergenerational relationships and shaping the nature of interactions between marginalized youth and the adults in their communities. She also is further examining the mechanisms that drive the promotive effects of natural mentoring relationships and developing an intervention focused on enhancing positive intergenerational relationships between adolescents and the nonparental adults in their everyday lives. She runs the Promoting Healthy Adolescent Development (PHAD) Lab at the University of Virginia. She is a current William T. Grant Scholar and a Spencer/National Academy of Education Postdoctoral Fellow. In 2015, she was recognized as a Rising Star by the Association for Psychological Science. She has published her research findings in a host of journals including Child Development, Developmental Psychology, the American Journal of Community Psychology, the Journal of Research on Adolescence, and the Journal of Youth and Adolescence. Her research is currently funded by the William T. Grant Foundation, the Institute of Education Sciences (U.S. Department of Education), and the National Science Foundation.

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Richard Fabes is the John O. Whiteman Dean's Distinguished Professor of Child Development and the Founding Director of the School of Social and Family Dynamics at Arizona State University. He received his PhD in child development from Oklahoma State University. His research interests include children’s adaptation to school, peer relationships, emotional development, and gender and adjustment. His current research projects include several large inter-disciplinary enterprises, including a large scale research and translational initiative on diversity and inclusion science (http://diversityinclusionscience.org) focused on understanding how to maximize the assets and benefits of diversity and minimize barriers and problems associated with it.

Key publications:

  • Fabes, R. A., Hayford, S., Pahlke, E., Santos, C., Zosuls, K., Martin, C. L., & Hanish, L. D. (2014). Peer influences on gender differences in educational aspiration and attainment. In J. Eccles & I. Schoon (Eds.), Gender Differences in Aspirations and Attainment (pp. 29-52).  Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Halpern, D. F., Eliot, L., Bigler, R. S., Fabes, R. A., Hanish, L. D., Hyde, J., Liben, L. S., & Martin, C. L. (2011). The pseudoscience of single-sex schooling. Science, 333, 1706-1707.

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Sam Putnam is Professor of Psychology at Bowdoin College.  He has served as consulting or guest editor for Psychological Assessment, Child Development and Infant and Child Development; and hosted the 2010 meeting of the Temperament Consortium.  Much of Sam’s research has concerned the development and refinement of parent-report measures of temperament, and he continues to manage the dissemination of the Rothbart battery of questionnaires, which have been requested by over 6,000 researchers in 60 countries since 2006.  His more recent research concerns the influence of culture upon development, and his ongoing study explores relations between parental ethnotheories, discipline styles, daily activities, temperament and behavior problems as reported by parents in 15 countries around the globe.  A strong advocate for undergraduate involvement in developmental science, Sam is co-chair of the Committee for Undergraduate Research of the International Congress on Infant Studies, and recently secured funding from National Science Foundation and National Institutes for Mental Health to support undergraduate student travel to the International Conferences on Infant Studies (ICIS) through 2020.

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Sheri Bauman is a professor and director of the Counseling graduate program at the University of Arizona. Prior to earning her doctorate in 1999, she worked in public schools for 30 years, 18 of those as a school counselor. She was also a licensed psychologist (currently inactive). Dr. Bauman conducts research on bullying, cyberbullying, and peer victimization, and also studies teacher responses to bullying. She is a frequent presenter on these topics at local, state, national, and international conferences. She is the author or first author of five books and third author of one other book, has over 60 publications in peer-reviewed journals, many book chapters, three training dvds, and numerous other publications. She has been the recipient of two grants from the National Science Foundation and her current work focuses on a study  funded a grant from the National Institute of Justice to investigate how School Resource Officers impact school climate and safety (including bullying), and to test the value added of an enhanced model for training SROs.

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Tama Leventhal is Professor in the Eliot-Pearson Department of Child Study and Human Development at Tufts University.  She is a developmental psychologist who has spent her career in policy and applied academic settings.  She received her degree (with distinction) from Teachers College, Columbia University.  Her primary research focus is the role of neighborhood contexts in the lives of children, youth, and families; related work centers housing. She was a Co-Investigator on most of the leading neighborhood studies and an Adolescence Investigator for Phase IV of the NICHD Study of Child Care and Youth Development.  Leventhal was formerly a U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Postdoctoral Urban Scholar, a William T. Grant Scholar, and a Foundation for Child Development Changing Faces of America’s Children Young Scholar.  She was Co-Director of the MacArthur Network on Housing and Families with Children and is currently Co-Director of the Housing and Children’s Healthy Development study.  Other professional activities include Associate Editor of the Journal of Research on Adolescence and Applied Developmental Science and Chair of the Steering Committee of the University-Based Child and Family Policy Consortium.

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Xinyin Chen is Professor of Psychology at the Graduate School of Education, University of Pennsylvania.  His research interest is mainly in children’s and adolescents’ socioemotional functioning (e.g., shyness-inhibition, social competence, depression), social relationships, school adjustment, and family socialization processes from a cultural-contextual perspective.  He has been conducting, with his international collaborators, a series of large-scale, longitudinal projects in Brazil, Canada, China, Italy, and the United States.  He has also investigated adjustment experiences, including the difficulties and strengths, of different generations of Asian children and adolescents in North America.  His recent work has tapped the implications of macro-level societal changes for human development.  Most of his empirical articles have been published in developmental journals such as Child Development and Developmental Psychology.  He has received a Scholars Award from the William T. Grant Foundation, an Eastern Scholars Award from Shanghai Institutions of Higher Learning, and several other awards for his scientific work.  He is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association (APA, Div. 7), the Association for Psychological Science (APS), and the American Educational Research Association (AERA).  He is currently the President of the International Society for the Study of Behavioral Development (ISSBD).  

  • Chen, X., Liu, J., Ellis, W., & Zarbatany, L. (2016).  Social sensitivity and adjustment in Chinese and Canadian children.  Child Development, 87, 1115–1129.
  • Chen, X., & Schmidt, L. (2015).  Temperament and personality.  In M. E. Lamb (Vol. Ed.) & R. M. Lerner (Series Ed.), Handbook of Child Psychology and Developmental Science, Vol. 3, Socioemotional Processes (7th edition) (pp. 152-200).  New York: Wiley.

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Robert Lickliter is Professor of Psychology at Florida International University.  His research concentrations are comparative developmental psychology and developmental psychobiology. His research and scholarship has focused primarily on behavioral embryology, early perceptual development, and the links between developmental and evolutionary theory.  A major focus of his research is the development of intersensory perception in animal and human infants, with a particular interest on the role of selective attention in perceptual processing, learning, and memory. His theoretical efforts have addressed the assumptive base of the nature-nurture debate, the role of experience in development, and the history of developmental thinking in biology and psychology. Dr. Lickliter has served as Associate Editor of Developmental Science, as well as numerous editorial boards, including Infancy, Developmental Psychobiology, and Journal of Comparative Psychology. He is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association and the Association for Psychological Science and received the Frank Beach Comparative Psychology Award from the APA.

Sample publications:

  • Lickliter, R., & Honeycutt, H. (2015).  Biology, development, and human systems.  In: W. F. Overton & P. C. M. Molenaar (Vol. Eds.)  Handbook of child psychology and developmental science. Vol. 1: Theory & method (7th ed., pp. 162-207). Wiley Blackwell.
  • Bahrick, L.E., & Lickliter, R. (2014). Learning to attend: The dual role of intersensory redundancy.  Current Directions in Psychological Science, 23, 414-420.

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Deborah Rivas-Drake is an Associate Professor of Psychology and Education at the University of Michigan. Her research focuses on ethnic and racial processes in academic and social-emotional development among diverse adolescents. Together with the CASA Lab, Dr. Rivas-Drake is exploring the role of schools, families, peers, and communities in the development of ethnic-racial identity, and how such identities shape youths’ academic and psychological outcomes. Her research has been published in Child Development, Developmental Psychology, Journal of Research on Adolescence, and Journal of Youth and Adolescence, among others. Dr. Rivas-Drake recently completed a term as an Associate Editor for Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology and is currently an Associate Editor for Developmental Psychology. Her research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, Spencer Foundation, Russell Sage Foundation, and AERA Grants Program. She is currently a Spencer Midcareer Fellow.

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Jennifer Lansford’s research is directed toward understanding how cultural and social contexts moderate the influence of socializing agents (e.g., parents, friends) on trajectories of social and behavioral development from childhood to adulthood. Her work integrates longitudinal methods of developmental psychology with theories from social cognition and developmental psychopathology. She is Principal Investigator of the Parenting Across Cultures project, a longitudinal study of mothers, fathers, and children from nine countries (China, Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and the United States). The following publications highlight some of her research.

  • Lansford, J. E., Bornstein, M. H., Deater-Deckard, K., Dodge, K. A., Al-Hassan, S. M., Bacchini, D., Bombi, A. S., Chang, L., Chen, B.-B., Di Giunta, L., Malone, P. S., Oburu, P., Pastorelli, C., Skinner, A. T., Sorbring, E., Steinberg, L., Tapanya, S., Alampay, L. P., Uribe Tirado, L. M., & Zelli, A. (2016). How international research on parenting advances understanding of child development. Child Development Perspectives, 10, 202-207.
  • Lansford, J. E., Godwin, J., Uribe Tirado, L. M., Zelli, A., Al-Hassan, S. M., Bacchini, D., Bombi, A. S., Bornstein, M. H., Chang, L., Deater-Deckard, K., Di Giunta, L., Dodge, K. A., Malone, P. S., Oburu, P., Pastorelli, C., Skinner, A. T., Sorbring, E., Tapanya, S., & Alampay, L. P. (2015). Individual, family, and culture level contributions to child physical abuse and neglect: A longitudinal study in nine countries. Development and Psychopathology, 27, 1417-1428.

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Kimberly Updegraff Bio coming soon.

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Saturday Lunch


Susanne Denham is an applied developmental psychologist and University Professor of psychology at George Mason University, with M.A. from The Johns Hopkins University and Ph.D. from University of Maryland, Baltimore County.  Her research on emotional competence in children’s social and academic functioning has been funded by NIMH, NICHD, IES, WT Grant Foundation, and John Templeton Foundation.  She is author of two books and numerous scholarly articles. Along with participation on several editorial boards, Denham is current editor of Early Education and Development. She has served on APA’s Division 7 Executive Committee and Working Group on Children’s Mental Health. She strongly espouses a philosophical stance fitting with BSA participation: Development and application of scientific psychology to enhance human potential through research-based practice and practice-informed research.

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Carol M. Worthman holds the Samuel Candler Dobbs Chair in the Department of Anthropology, Emory University, where she also directs the Laboratory for Comparative Human Biology. After a dual undergraduate degree in biology and botany at Pomona College, Dr. Worthman took her PhD in biological anthropology at Harvard University, having also studied endocrinology at UCSD and neuroscience at MIT under Jack Geller and Richard Wurtman, respectively. After a postdoc in human development with Jerome Kagan, Robert LeVine, and Beatrice Whiting, she joined the nascent anthropology faculty at Emory University, and established a pioneering laboratory advancing the use of biomarkers in population research. Professor Worthman takes a biocultural approach to pursuit of comparative interdisciplinary research on human development, reproductive ecology, and biocultural bases of differential mental and physical health. She has conducted cross-cultural biosocial research in thirteen countries, including Kenya, Tibet, Nepal, Egypt, Japan, Papua New Guinea, Vietnam and South Africa, as well as in rural, urban, and semi-urban areas of the United States. For over 20 years, she collaborated with Jane Costello and Adrian Angold in the Great Smoky Mountains Study, a large, longitudinal, population-based developmental epidemiological project in western North Carolina.  Current work includes a study of the impact of television on adolescent sleep/wake patterns in the context of a controlled experiment with Vietnamese villages lacking both television and electricity.

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Cynthia García Coll is the Charles Pitts Robinson and John Palmer Barstow Professor of Education, Psychology and Pediatrics at Brown University. She received her Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology from Harvard University in 1982. She has published extensively on the sociocultural and biological influences on child development with particular emphasis on at-risk and minority populations. She has served on the editorial boards of many prestigious academic journals, including Child Development, Development and Psychopathology, Infant Behavior and Development, Infancy and Human Development, and she was the senior Editor of Developmental Psychology from 2004 to 2010. She was a member of the MacArthur Foundation Network: "Successful Pathways Through Middle Childhood" from 1994-2002. She was the Chair of the Committee on Racial and Ethnic Issues for the Society for Research on Child Development (SRCD) from 1991-1993 and from 2001-2005. She served on the SRCD Governing Council from 1996-2002 and is currently on the Steering Committee of the Society for the Study of Human Development. She is the president of that group starting in 2010. She is currently the Chair of the Faculty Executive Committee at Brown University. In addition, she has co-edited several books including The Psychosocial Development of Puerto Rican Women; Puerto Rican Women and Children: Issues in Health, Growth and Development; Mothering Against the Odds: Diverse Voices of Contemporary Mothers; and Nature and Nurture: The Complex Interplay of Genetic and Environmental Influences on Human Behavior and Development. Dr. Garcia Coll was the 2009 recipient of the SRCD "Cultural and Contextual Contributions to Child Development" award. Her current research seeks to document and explain the immigrant paradox in education and behavior as evidenced by U.S. children and adolescents. Dr. García Coll's latest book, Immigrant Stories (Oxford, 2009) details the developmental contexts of 3 Rhode Island immigrant groups. Her edited book, Is becoming American a Developmental Risk, was published in the spring of 2011.

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David K. Dickinson received his doctorate from Harvard University’s Graduate School of Education after teaching elementary school in Philadelphia PA while earning his Master’s degree at Temple University and BA from Oberlin College.  He has studied the language and literacy development of children from low-income backgrounds.  He was co-PI of the first longitudinal study of language and literacy development that included detailed classroom observational data and data on parent-child interactions. That study and subsequent work described the language environments in preschool classroom and identified interactional strategies that support language learning that are related to improved language and reading comprehension. With Judy Schickedanz he authored a comprehensive preschool curriculum that is used in cities across the United States.  He and Debbie Rowe from Vanderbilt led a successful four-year effort to pre-k teachers improve children’s language and literacy skills in Nashville pre-k classrooms. He also led a five-year Vanderbilt project that created a model preschool and primary grade school in Abu Dhabi.  He now is developing an approach that uses book reading and play to foster language growth.  He has authored or co-authored over 100 peer-review articles and is co-editor of three volumes of the Handbook of Early Literacy Research.

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Deborah Phillips is Professor of Psychology and Associated Faculty in the McCourt School of Public Policy Institute at Georgetown University. She was the first Executive Director of the Board on Children, Youth, and Families at the National Academies and served as Study Director for the Board’s report: From Neurons to Neighborhoods: The Science of Early Child Development. She has also served as President of the Foundation for Child Development, Director of Child Care Information Services at the National Association for the Education of Young Children, and Congressional Science Fellow (Society for Research in Child Development). Her research focuses on the developmental effects of early childhood programs for both typically developing children and those with special needs, including research on child care, Head Start, and state pre-kindergarten programs. Dr. Phillips currently serves on the National Board for Education Sciences for the U.S. Department of Education. She is a Fellow of the American Psychological Society and the American Psychological Association. In 2011, she received the Distinguished Contributions to Education in Child Development Award from the Society for Research in Child Development.  

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Dorothy L. Espelage, Ph.D., is Professor of Psychology at the University of Florida.  She is the recipient of the APA Lifetime Achievement Award in Prevention Science and the 2016 APA Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy, and is a Fellow of APS, APA, and AERA.  She earned her Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology from Indiana University in 1997.  Over the last 20 years, she has authored over 140 peer reviewed articles, five edited books, and 30 chapters on bullying, homophobic teasing, sexual harassment, dating violence, and gang violence. Her research focuses on translating empirical findings into prevention and intervention programming and she has secured six and half million dollars of external funding. She advises members of Congress and Senate on bully prevention legislation. She conducts regular webinars for CDC, NIH, and NIJ to disseminate research. She just completed a CDC-funded study that included a randomized clinical trial of a social emotional learning prevention program in 36 middle schools to reduce aggression. National Institute of Justice (NIJ) is funding her to track these kids to examine whether these effects remain as kids navigate challenges of high school. CDC is funding another RCT of this program in comparison to a gender-enhanced social-emotional program in 28 Illinois middle schools.  She just received a 5-year large grant to prevent bullying and promote school safety in high schools from NIJ. Also, she is PI on a CDC-funded grant to evaluate a youth suicide prevention program on sexual violence outcomes in 24 Colorado high schools. She authored a 2011 White House Brief on bullying among LGBTQ youth and attended the White House Conference in 2011, and has been a consultant on the stopbullying.gov website and consultant to the National Anti-bullying Campaign, Health Resources and Services Administration  (HRSA) in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). She has presented multiple times at the Federal Partnership to End Bullying Summit and Conference. She is a consultant to the National Institutes of Health Pathways to Prevention Initiative to address bullying and youth suicide. Dr. Espelage has appeared on many television news and talk shows, including The Today Show; CNN; CBS Evening News; The Oprah Winfrey Show, Anderson, Anderson 360 and has been quoted in the national print press, including Time Magazine, USA Today, People, Boston Globe, and the Wall Street Journal.  Her dedicated team of undergraduate and graduate students are committed to the dissemination of the research through various mechanisms (www.dorothyespelage.com).  

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Frosso Motti-Stefanidi is Professor of Psychology at the University of Athens, Greece. She received her B.A. (with distinction Summa Cum Laude), M.A. and PhD from the Institute of Child Development, University of Minnesota, USA.  She is recipient of the Distinguished International Alumni Award from the College of Education and Human Development of the University of Minnesota.

Dr Motti-Stefanidi has served as Chair of the Department of Psychology, University of Athens, as President of the European Association for
Developmental Psychology, and as President of the European Association of Personality Psychology. She is currently serving on SRCD’s Governing Council.

Her research focuses on immigrant youth adaptation and wellbeing in the Greek school context. Her work is conducted from a risk and resilience developmental perspective. She has conducted two large longitudinal studies of over 2000 immigrant middle-school adolescents and their Greek classmates. The first study was conducted before the Greek economic crisis and the second when the economic crisis was in full swing. Her main research question is “Who among immigrant youth does well, and why?” Additionally, she has examined whether and how the economic crisis affected the adaptation of immigrant and nonimmigrant youth. She is author of over 100 papers and chapters in journals and edited books in Greek and English, and of two books in Greek.

  • Motti-Stefanidi, F. (2014). Immigrant youth adaptation in the Greek school context: A risk and resilience perspective. Child Development Perspectives, 8(3), 180-185.
  • Motti-Stefanidi, F., Berry, J., Chryssochoou, X., Sam, D. L. & Phinney, J., (2012). Immigrant youth adaptation in context: Developmental, acculturation and social psychological perspectives. In A.S. Masten, K. Liebkind, & D. J. Hernandez (Eds.), Realizing the potential of immigrant youth. (pp. 117-158). New York: Cambridge University Press.

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Hirokazu Yoshikawa is Professor of Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is a developmental and community psychologist who conducts research on the development of children in the U.S., China, and Chile. He focuses on the effects of public policies, particularly those related to parental employment, poverty and early childhood care and education, on children of diverse ethnic and immigrant backgrounds. He is currently working on a cluster-randomized experimental evaluation of Un Buen Comienzo, an initiative in Chile to strengthen preschool children's language, literacy, and health through a two-year teacher professional development program. He is also a PI of the Center for Research on Culture, Development and Education. He received the Boyd McCandless Award for early career contributions to developmental psychology, from Division 7 of the American Psychological Association (APA), and received three other early career awards from divisions of the APA. He serves on the Board on Children, Youth and Families of the National Academy of Sciences, the Scholars Selection Committee of the William T. Grant Foundation, and the Board of Zero to Three. He regularly consults to NGO's and foundations, such as the World Bank, the Inter-American Development Bank, and UNICEF, regarding early childhood development and programs. He has edited two recent volumes, Making it Work: Low-Wage Employment, Family Life, and Child Development (Russell Sage, 2006, with Thomas S. Weisner and Edward Lowe) and Toward Positive Youth Development: Transforming Schools and Community Programs (Oxford, 2008, with Marybeth Shinn), which received an award for best edited volume from the Society for Research in Adolescence. He also co-edited a recent issue of New Directions in Child and Adolescent Development, entitled "Beyond the Family; Social Contexts of Immigrant Children's Development" (2008, with Niobe Way). He is author of the book, entitled Immigrants Raising Citizens: Undocumented Parents and Their Young Children (Russell Sage).

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Martha Ann Bell, Our research team uses a developmental psychobiology perspective to examine individual differences in early developing self-regulation, with a focus on executive functions and emotion regulation. Currently, we are following a large group of children as they develop from early infancy through middle childhood.  We are collecting behavioral and electrophysiological (EEG, EKG) measures of cognition, emotion, and temperament at each age.  Here are 2 examples of our published work.  The first paper is from a former undergrad in our lab.

  • Howarth, G.Z., Fettig, N.B., Curby, T.W., & Bell, M.A. (2016).  Frontal EEG asymmetry and temperament across infancy and early childhood: An exploration of stability and bidirectional relations.  Child Development, 87, 465-476.
  • Bell, M.A. (2012). A psychobiological perspective on working memory performance at 8 months of age.  Child Development, 83, 251-265.

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Mary Gauvain is Professor of Psychology at UC Riverside, where she directs the Cognitive Development Laboratory. Her research, funded by the NSF, NIH and Spencer Foundation, examines social and cultural influences on cognitive development. She has conducted research on the development of spatial thinking and planning skills as well on the relation of cultural change to cognitive development. She is the author of The Social Context of Cognitive Development (Guilford, 2001), and a recent chapter on Cognitive Development and Culture (with Susan Perez) appears in the 2015 edition of the Handbook of Child Psychology and Developmental Science (New York: Wiley). She is currently the PI on an NSF IGERT award entitled Water SENSE: Social, Engineering, and Natural Science Engagement, and is conducting research on water-related behaviors and beliefs in children and adults. She serves on the Governing Council of the Society of Research in Child Development and was recently elected as an at-large member of the Governing Board of Division 7 (Developmental Psychology) of APA. 

  • Gauvain, M., & McLaughlin, H. (2016). Contamination sensitivity among children and adults in rural Uganda. International Perspectives in Psychology: Research, Practice, Consultation, 5, 141-155.
  • Gauvain, M., & Munroe, R. L. (2013). Children’s questions in cross-cultural perspective: A four-culture study. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 44, 1148-1165.
  • Gauvain, M., & Munroe, R. L. (2009). Contributions of societal modernity to cognitive development: A comparison of four cultures. Child Development, 80, 1628-1642.
  • Gauvain, M., & Perez, S. M. (2008). Mother-child planning and child compliance. Child Development, 79, 761-775.
  • Gauvain, M., de la Ossa, J., & Hurtado, M. (2001). Parental guidance as children learn to use cultural tools: The case of pictorial plans. Cognitive Development, 16, 551-575.

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Michael Cunningham holds the academic rank of Professor at Tulane University He has a joint faculty appointment in the Department of Psychology and the undergraduate program in Africana Studies.  He serves as an Associate Provost for Graduate Studies and Research in Tulane University’s Office of Academic Affairs. In addition to overseeing the PhD and research masters’ programs, he runs the Office of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies, which includes programing and administrative approval for the university’s postdoctoral fellows. As a developmental psychologist, Mike has a program of research that focuses on racial, ethnic, psychosocial, and socioeconomic processes that affect psychological well‐being, adjustment to chronic stressful events, and academic achievement among African American adolescents and their families. He uses mixed methods in his current research project that includes the study of gender‐specific patterns of resilience and vulnerability in urban African American participants.

Mike has received external funding from several sources including the National Science Foundation, The Mellon Foundation, the Louisiana Board of Regents, and The Department of Education. He has been recognized for his research from the National Research Council. He has received Tulane’s highest teaching award and been designated as a Suzanne and Stephen Weiss Presidential Fellow. He completed his doctoral work at Emory University after completing an undergraduate degree at Morehouse College. Mike also completed a post‐doctoral fellowship at the University of Pennsylvania. Mike’s current professional service includes serving as an Associate Editor for Child Development and on the editorial boards of Research in Human Development and Journal of Negro Education. He also serves on the Society for Research in Child Development’s Governing Council, the Society for Research in Adolescence’s Executive Committee, the Association of Graduate Schools’ Executive Committee, and the Council of Southern Graduate School’s Executive Committee.

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Nancy C. Jordan is Professor of Learning Sciences at the University of Delaware.  Her research interests are in children’s mathematical development and learning difficulties.  In particular, she is doing research on the development of early number sense and how children learn fractions.  She also has developed successful interventions for high-risk children. Professor Jordan has received funding from NICHD, IES and the Spencer Foundation.  She is author or co-author of many articles in children’s math and has recently published articles in Child Development, the Journal of Learning Disabilities, Developmental Science, Developmental Psychology, and the Journal of Research on Mathematics Education, among many others. Professor Jordan holds a Bachelors degree from the University of Iowa, where she was awarded Phi Beta Kappa, and a Masters degree from Northwestern University.  She received her doctoral degree in education from Harvard University and completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Chicago.  Before beginning her doctoral studies, she taught elementary school children with special needs.  Recently, Professor Jordan served on the Committee on Early Childhood Mathematics of the National Research Council of the National Academies and on the panel of IES practice guide on teaching math to young children. She serves on the editorial boards of several research journals. 

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Nora S. Newcombe is Laura H. Carnell Professor of Psychology and James H. Glackin Distinguished Faculty Fellow at Temple University. She received her B.A. in 1972 from Antioch College, her Ph.D. in 1976 from Harvard University, and came to Temple in 1981 after first teaching at Penn State. Her research focuses on spatial cognition and development, and the development of episodic memory. She is currently Principal Investigator of the NSF-funded Spatial Intelligence and Learning Center (SILC). The purpose of the Spatial Intelligence and Learning Center (SILC) is to develop the science of spatial learning and to use this knowledge to transform educational practice, supporting children and adults in acquiring the scientific, technical, engineering, and mathematical (STEM) skills required for effective participation in an increasingly high-technology society and global economy.

Dr. Newcombe is the author of numerous chapters, articles, and books, including Making Space with Janellen Huttenlocher (MIT Press, 2000). Her work has been recognized by numerous awards, including the Distinguished Scientific Contributions Award from SRCD (2015), the William James Award from APS (2014), the George A. Miller Award for an Outstanding Recent Article in General Psychology (awarded twice, in 2004 and 2014) and the G. Stanley Hall Award for Distinguished Contribution to Developmental Psychology (2007). She was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (2006) and to the Society of Experimental Psychologists (2008). She has served as Editor of the Journal of Experimental Psychology: General and Associate Editor of Psychological Bulletin, as well as on many grant panels and advisory boards, and has been a Visiting Professor at the University of Pennsylvania, Princeton, and the Wissenschaftskolleg in Berlin. She is currently the Chair of the Governing Board of the Cognitive Science Society, Chair-Elect of Section J (Psychology) of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and Chair-Elect of the Federation of Associations of Behavioral and Brain Sciences. 

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Robert H. Bradley, Ph.D., is Director of the Family and Human Dynamics Research Institute at ASU.  He is a member of the HHS/HRSA Advisory Committee on Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visitation Program Evaluation and on the editorial boards of Parenting: Science and Practice, Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, and Early Childhood Research Quarterly.  He previously served as associate editor for both Child Development and Early Childhood Research Quarterly. He has more than 350 publications dealing with parenting, early education, fathers, child care, and the relation between home environments and children’s health and development.  Dr. Bradley is one of the developers of the HOME Inventory. 

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Roberta Michnick Golinkoff, Ph.D., is the Unidel H. Rodney Sharp Professor of Education, Psychology, and Linguistics at the University of Delaware and runs the Child’s Play, Learning, and Development laboratory. She has received numerous awards for her contributions to developmental science. Funded by federal agencies, she has written 16 books and monographs.  Passionate about the dissemination of psychological science for improving our schools and families’ lives, she and Hirsh-Pasek (her long standing collaborator) wrote the just released, Becoming Brilliant: What Science Tells Us About Raising Successful Children.  Dr. Golinkoff also co-founded the Ultimate Block Party movement to celebrate the science of playful learning as well as the Urban Thinkscape project.  She has appeared on Good Morning America, other radio and television shows, and in print media. She never turns down an opportunity to spread the findings of psychological science to the lay public.

You can follow Roberta on Twitter at @KathyandRo1. 

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Sandra L. Calvert, Ph.D., is Professor of Psychology at Georgetown University and Director of the Children’s Digital Media Center, a multi-site interdisciplinary research center funded by multiple grants from the National Science Foundation and several private foundations. Her current research focuses on how young children create relationships with media characters, and the impact of those relationships on children's diets and math skills in observational (e.g., TV programs) and interactive (e.g., app, Intelligent Agent) experiences.

Professor Calvert has authored more than 100 empirical journal articles and book chapters as well as seven books.  Her books include Children’s Journeys Through the Information Age (McGraw-Hill, 1999), Children in the Digital Age: Influences of Electronic Media on Development (co-edited with Amy B. Jordan & Rodney R. Cocking, Greenwood Publishing Group, 2002), and the Handbook of Children, Media, and Development (co-edited with Barbara J. Wilson, Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, 2008, 2011). She has served on two committees for the National Academies, leading to four committee co-authored books including Food Marketing to Children and Youth: Threat or Opportunity (2006) and Youth, Pornography, and the Internet (2002).

Professor Calvert is a fellow of Division 7 of the American Psychological Association and a fellow of the International Communication Association.  She has consulted for numerous companies, including Sesame Workshop, Blue's Clues, Super!Why, Leapfrog, and Wild Kratts to improve the quality of children’s media. 

  • Calvert, S.L., Richards, M.N. & Kent, C. (2014). Personalized interactive characters for toddlers' learning of seriation from a video presentation. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 35, 148-155.  10.1016/j.appdev.2014.03.004
  • Calvert, S.L., Appelbaum, M.I., Dodge, K.A., Graham, S., Hall, G.C.N., Hamby, S.L., Fasig-Caldwell, L., Citkovitz, M., Galloway, D.P. & Hodges, L.V. (in press). The American Psychological Association Task Force Assessment of Violent Videogames: Science in the Service of Public Interest. American Psychologist, 1-17. DOI: 10.1037/a0040413

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Seth Pollak is the Letters and Science Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Professor of Pediatrics, Anthropology, Neuroscience, and Public Affairs at the University of Wisconsin – Madison. He earned dual Ph.D.s from the University of Rochester in brain & cognitive sciences and in child clinical psychology. Seth’s research focuses on the influences of social risk factors on children’s brain and behavioral development, with particular focus on children’s emotions, early learning, and health. Seth is a recipient of the Boyd-McCandless Award for Distinguished Contributions to Child Development, the American Psychological Association’s Distinguished Early Career Award in Developmental Psychology, as well as the Chancellor’s Distinguished Teaching Award from the University of Wisconsin. He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Association for Psychological Science, as well as a member of SRCD’s Governing Council. His most recent projects focus on the biobehavioral affects of family poverty on children’s development, the effects of stress exposure on the emergence of children’s learning abilities, and the role of emotion perception on children’s stress regulation.

  • Hair NL, Hanson JL, Wolfe BL, Pollak SD. (2015) Association of child poverty, brain development, and academic achievement. JAMA Pediatrics. 2015 Sep 1;169(9):822-9. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2015.1475. PMID: 26192216. NIHMSID: NIHMS729417.
  • Romens, S. E., McDonald, J., Svaren, J. and Pollak, S. D. (2015), Associations Between Early Life Stress and Gene Methylation in Children. Child Development. 2015 Jan-Feb;86(1):303-9. doi: 10.1111/cdev.12270. Epub 2014 Jul 24. PubMed PMID: 25056599; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4305348.
  • Pollak SD. (2015) Developmental psychopathology: recent advances and future challenges. World Psychiatry. 2015 Oct;14(3):262-9. doi: 10.1002/wps.20237. PubMed PMID: 26407771; PMCID: PMC4592638.

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Stacey S. Horn, (Ph.D. 2000, University of Maryland) is a Professor of Educational and Developmental Psychology and Chair of the Department of Educational Psychology, affiliate faculty member in Community Psychology and Prevention Research, and Program Director for the M.Ed. program in Youth Development at University of Illinois at Chicago. Her current research focuses on issues of sexual prejudice and bias-motivated harassment among adolescents, adolescents’ reasoning about peer harassment, as well as LGBT students’ experiences in schools and communities. Much of this work looks at the underlying moral, social, and personal dimension of exclusion and peer harassment, how adolescents construct an understanding of their peer interactions based on these dimension, and the role that bias plays in adolescents understanding and experiences of harassment. Stacey has served on the Editorial Boards for the Journal of Youth and Adolescence, International Journal of Behavioral Development, and the Journal of Gay and Lesbian Youth, served as Chair of the Equity and Justice Committee for the Society for Research in Child Development, and is a past-chair of the Governing Board for the Illinois Safe Schools Alliance. She has published articles in journals such as Developmental Psychology, Journal of Social Issues, Journal of Youth and Adolescence, Cognitive Development, and Equity and Excellence in Education.  She is a past recipient of the Wayne F. Placek Award from the American Psychological Foundation (2002), the Outstanding Dissertation Award from Division 7 (Developmental) from the American Psychological Association, and the Outstanding Youth Scholar award from the University of Maryland Alumni Association. Stacey is a former high school English teacher and has worked with young people for over 25 years.

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Thomas Dishion Bio coming soon.

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Sandra Graham Bio coming soon.

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Questions? Contact Casey Irelan at cirelan@srcd.org or (734) 926-0612.