Interdisciplinary Day: Friday March 22, 2019

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8:00 am - 9:30 am   CONCURRENT SESSIONS

Title: Replication, Reproducibility, and Research Accumulation in Developmental Science

Location: TBA

Noel A. Card is Professor of Human Development and Family Studies at the University of Connecticut. His research focuses on both social development and developmental methodology.  Specifically, he has studied the development of aggression and peer victimization, dyadic relationship with peers, and character development, primarily during middle childhood through adolescence. He uses and studies various quantitative methodologies, including methods for longitudinal data, dyadic data, and meta-analysis.  He is former co-founder of the biennial Developmental Methods conference and is currently editor of the Journal of Research on Adolescence.

Abstract: Concerns about replication and the reproducibility of empirical findings have risen dramatically in psychology over the past decade.  It is reasonable to ask whether developmental science is similarly facing such a “replication crisis” and, if so, what should be done about it.  The first portion of this talk will review the concerns commonly raised in psychology and related disciplines, as well as recommendations put forth for encouraging replication, open science, and responsible data analysis practices.  The second portion of this talk will consider the unique position of developmental science, relative to the experimental subdisciplines of psychology that have predominated much of the discussion about replication.  Specifically, I will consider some of the challenges of replication and reproducibility with large, naturalistic, longitudinal studies, as well as the greater emphasis on contextual, developmental, and historic differences inherent in much of developmental research.  The third portion of this talk will propose a new paradigm, in which individual study results are deemphasized and accumulating streams of multiple study results are prioritized as sources of knowledge within developmental science.  Tools for facilitating this research accumulation will be described, as will challenges of this approach within our traditional approach conducting developmental science.

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Title: Life, Death, and Mental Health: How Access to Care Helps Children Succeed

Location: TBA

Janet Currie is the Henry Putnam Professor of Economics and Public Affairs at Princeton University and the Co-director of Princeton's Center for Health and Wellbeing. She also co-directs the Program on Families and Children at the National Bureau of Economic Research. She is the in-coming President of the American Society of Health Economics, has served as the Vice President of the American Economics Association, and is a member of the National Academy of Medicine and of the American Academy of Art and Sciences. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, the Society of Labor Economists, and of the Econometric Society, and has honorary degrees from the University of Lyon and the University of Zurich.  Dr. Currie is a pioneer in the economic analysis of child development. Her current research focuses on socioeconomic differences in health and access to health care, environmental threats to health, and the important role of mental health.

Abstract: The U.S. provides a case study of how increasing access to health care prenatally and in early childhood reduces deaths and leads to long-term improvements in child and young adult outcomes. While inequality in mortality increased in the U.S. among older adults, it declined among children and approached the low levels seen in countries such as Canada. Improved mental health appears to be an important mechanism, driving better outcomes in surviving children.

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10:00 am - 11:30 am   CONCURRENT SESSIONS

Topic: TBA

Location: TBA

Diana W. Bianchi, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

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Topic: Early childhood education and economic inequality and child development

Location: TBA

James J. Heckman is the Henry Shultz Distinguished Service Professor of Economics and Public Policy and Director of the Center for the Economics of Human Development at the University of Chicago. He works to understand the origins of inequality, social mobility, and the formation of skills and regulation in labor markets. He also devises and applies empirical strategies to address these questions. Heckman has published over 300 articles and 9 books. Heckman has received the Nobel Prize in Economics, the John Bates Clark Medal, the Jacob Mincer Award, the Dennis Aigner Award, the Ulysses Medal, the Theodore W. Schultz Award, the Frisch Medal, the Dan David Prize, and is a Distinguished Fellow of the American Economic Association.

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11:30 am - 12:30 pm   TAD TALKS ON INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH (CONSECUTIVE)

Topic: Infant cognition and the application of fNIRS to study at-risk populations

Location: TBA

Sarah Lloyd-Fox, University of London

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Topic: Large scale interventions related to child development

Location: TBA

Jens Ludwig, University of Chicago

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Topic: Social neuroscience

Location: TBA

Piotr Winkielman, University of California - San Diego

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1:00 pm - 2:30 pm   CONCURRENT SESSIONS

Topic: Health and health disparities in American Indian families

Location: TBA

Donald K. Warne, North Dakota State University

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Topic: Language and culture

Location: TBA

Elinor Ochs, University of California - Los Angeles

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3:00 pm - 4:30 pm   CONCURRENT SESSIONS

Topic: Cognitive neuroscience of social cognition, theory of mind, and moral judgment

Location: TBA

Rebecca Saxe, the John W. Jarve (1978) Professor in Brain and Cognitive Sciences, is best known for her discovery of a brain region that is specialized for “theory of mind” tasks that involve understanding the mental states of other people. Although it was known previously that the brains of humans and animals have regions that are specialized for basic functions such as vision and motor control, this was the first example of a brain region specialized for constructing abstract thoughts. Saxe continues to study this region and its role in social cognition, and is exploring the theory-of-mind system as a promising candidate for understanding the biological basis of autism. Twitter: @rebecca_saxe.

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Title: Still In Search of the Zipperump-a-Zoo: Reflections on a Career Studying the Development of Intelligence

Location: TBA

Robert Sternberg is Professor of Human Development at Cornell University and Honorary Professor of Psychology at the University of Heidelberg. His PhD is from Stanford and he holds 13 honorary doctorates. Sternberg formerly was IBM Professor of Psychology and Education and Director of the Center for Abilities, Competencies, and Expertise at Yale University. Sternberg has won both the William James and James McKeen Cattell Awards from the Association for Psychological Science and the Grawemeyer Award in Psychology. He is a past-president of the American Psychological Association and the Federation of Associations in Behavioral and Brain Sciences. He is a member of the National Academy of Education and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Sternberg’s main interests are in intelligence, creativity, wisdom, love, and hate. Sternberg is the author of College Admissions for the 21st Century (Harvard University Press, 2010) and What Universities Can Be (Cornell University Press, 2016).

Abstract: In this talk, I will discuss the evolution of my thinking about intelligence. In the process, I will try to show how scientific thinking evolves over the course of a career, discarding or elaborating upon earlier ideas in favor of newer ones.  I will discuss, in turn, the componential theory of intelligence, the triarchic theory of intelligence, the theory of successful intelligence, the augmented theory of successful intelligence, and the new theory of intelligence serving as a mental immune system.  I will suggest that conventional views of intelligence have had a catastrophic effect on societies, resulting in the promotion of incompetent and often malign individuals into positions of leadership and authority, and leaving marginalized far more competent and benign people.  Societies may not have much time to change their practices.

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