Program Information

2013 Program Information:

  1. Online Program
  2. 2013 SRCD Program Book 
  3. 2013 Program Book Addendum
  4. Invited Program Schedule
  5. SECC Schedule of Events

2013 SRCD Biennial Meeting Invited Program

Program co-chairs Judy Garber, Vanderbilt University, and Sandra Graham, University of California, Los Angeles, invited prominent speakers from different areas of research to present at the biennial meeting.

Invited Master Lectures    Invited Addresses    Invited Symposia  Memorial Symposium  Invited Views by Two    Invited Roundtable    Special Symposium

Invited Master Lectures

​​The Adolescent Brain: From Human Imaging to Mouse Genetics

Speaker: BJ Casey, Ph.D., Director of the Sackler Institute, Weill Cornell Medical College
Chair: Charles A. Nelson, Children's Hospital Boston - Harvard Medical School
Saturday, April 20, 10:20 AM - 11:50 AM, Room 4C-2 (Washington Convention Center)

Abstract. Anxiety disorders (e.g., social phobia, separation and generalized anxiety) are the most common of the psychiatric disorders with a peak in diagnosis during adolescence and affecting as many as 10-20% of our youth. One of the most commonly used therapies to treat these disorders is exposure-based cognitive behavioral therapy that relies on basic principles of fear learning and extinction. A substantial portion of patients improves with this therapy, but 40-50% do not. This presentation will provide an overview of our recent empirical studies employing both human imaging and mouse genetics to examine how fear related processes differ across individuals and across development, especially during adolescence. Behavioral, genetic and brain imaging data will be provided to offer insights for whom may be at risk for anxiety and for whom and when, during development, exposure based treatment may be most effective for treating individuals with anxiety disorders.

Biography. Dr. BJ Casey is the Sackler Professor for Developmental Psychobiology and directs the Sackler Institute and the Neuroscience Graduate Program at Weill Cornell Medical College. Dr. Casey is a world leader in pediatric brain imaging and its use in typical and atypical development. She skillfully uses brain imaging to uniquely examine transitions into and out of developmental periods such as adolescence - a period of increased risk for psychiatric illnesses. Her leadership in the application of neuroimaging to behavioral development has provided crucial tools for this field that have been widely adopted. She has exploited various imaging methods to develop fundamental and influential of normal and abnormal brain development. Her most recent work uses human imaging and mouse genetics to identify the role of specific genes as a first step toward individualized and biologically targeted treatments of childhood disorders. Dr. Casey has made a truly outstanding contribution in the area of neurobiological research and the field will no doubt continue to significantly benefit from her position as a role model, influential mentor, and from her knowledge of brain development and its alteration in psychiatric disorders.


Early Environmental Regulation of Gene Expression and Brain Development: How Early Experience Exerts a Sustained Influence on Neuronal Function?

Speaker: Michael Meaney, C.M., PhD, C.Q., FRSC, Associate Director of the Research Centre, Douglas Institute Researcher, Douglas Institute James McGill Professor, Departments of Psychiatry and Neurology and Neurosurgery, McGill University Director, Program for the Study of Behaviour, Genes and Environment, McGill University
Thursday, April 18, 2:20 PM - 3:50 PM, Room 4C-3 (Washington Convention Center)

Abstract. Michael Meaney, was one of the first researchers to identify the importance of maternal care in modifying the expression of genes that regulate behavioral and neuroendocrine responses to stress, as well as hippocampal synaptic development. Dr. Meaney studies how parenting produces lasting effects on cognitive and emotional development. His lab examined development in rats and found parental influences on the chemical, or 'epigenetic', signals that control the activity in the brain of genes that influence the connections between brain cells as well as learning and memory. In adult animals that were licked more frequently by their mothers the epigenetic signals enhanced the activity of genes associated with learning and memory. These findings reveal that social influences during early life affect the activity of genes that affect the structure and function of brain regions critical for cognitive capacity.

 

Biography. Michael Meaney Ph.D. is currently James McGill Professor of Medicine in the Departments of Psychiatry and Neurology and Neurosurgery. He is also Director, Program for the study of Behavior, Genes and Environment at McGill University. He is interested in the mechanisms by which adversity in early life alters neural development so as to render certain individuals at risk for pathology later in life focusing on epigenetic influences. Early life events serve as potent determinants of vulnerability/resistance to chronic illness, including depression, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, and drug abuse.


Conceptual and Methodological Issues in Racial/Ethnic Identity Research

Speaker: Robert M. Sellers, Professor, University of Michigan
Chair: Sandra Graham, University of California, Los Angeles
Friday, April 19, 10:20 AM - 11:50 AM; Room 4C-3 (Washington Convention Center)

Abstract: A central theme in the psychological research on the life experiences of members of ethnic minority groups in the United State has been the various ways in which those individuals attempt to integrate their racial and or ethnic group membership into their conceptualization of self. As such, racial and ethnic identity has been the most heavily studied racial or ethnic construct in American psychology. As a researcher in the field of African American racial identity for the past twenty-five years, I will attempt to address three broad issues related to the research literature on racial identity: 1) the concept of racial versus ethnic identity; 2) the relation between theoretical and empirical research; and 3) the future of the field.  This lecture is intended for an audience who has had some exposure to the concept of racial/ethnic identity, but who are not necessarily experts in the field.

Biography: Robert Sellers is the Charles D. Moody Collegiate Professor of Psychology, Research Associate at the Institute for Social Research, and co-director of the Center for the Study of Black Youth in Context-- all at the University of Michigan.  His research focuses on the psychological role of race in African Americans’ lives.  He and his students have published extensively in the areas of racial identity, racial discrimination, and racial socialization.  He is a former President of the Society for the Psychological Study of Ethnic Minority Issues and a fellow of the American Psychological Association and the Association for Psychological Science.  He is currently serving as the Chair of the Department of Psychology at the University of Michigan.

Invited Addresses

Maladaptation and Resilience in Maltreated Children: A Multiple Levels of Analysis Perspective

Speaker: Dante Cicchetti, Ph.D., McKnight Presidential Chair, William Harris Professor and Professor of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Institute of Child Development, University of Minnesota
Chair: Ann S. Masten, University of Minnesota
Friday, April 19, 2:20 PM - 3:50 PM; Room 4C-3 (Washington Convention Center)

Abstract. Child maltreatment is a pathogenic relational experience that represents one of the most adverse and stressful challenges that confront children.  Child maltreatment ushers in motion a probabilistic cascading path of epigenesis for abused and neglected children that is marked by an increasing likelihood of failure and disruption in the successful resolution of salient developmental tasks.  This results in a profile of relatively enduring vulnerability factors that increase the probability of the emergence of maladaptive biological and psychological development and psychopathology across multiple levels of analysis.  Importantly, however, not all maltreated children develop in a maladaptive fashion.  Some abused and neglected children function in a competent fashion despite the pernicious experiences they have encountered and the ignominious treatment they have received.
Multilevel investigations have been conducted in our laboratory and in those of other investigators that incorporate genetic, neural, physiological, endocrinological, immunological, and psychological processes aimed at examining pathways to maladaptation, psychopathology, and resilience in maltreated children.  These multilevel studies are the focus of this address and suggestions for future intervention research are proffered with illustrations from planned and ongoing work in our laboratory.

Biography. Dante Cicchetti, PhD, is McKnight Presidential Chair and William Harris Professor of Child Psychology and Psychiatry at the University of Minnesota. After receiving his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology and Child Development from the University of Minnesota in 1977, Cicchetti joined the faculty at Harvard University where he was subsequently Assistant Professor (1977-1982) and Norman Tishman Associate Professor of Psychology and Social Relations (1983-1985). In 1985, Dante moved to Rochester, NY, where he established Mt. Hope Family Center, serving as its Director until 2005.
He has published over 450 articles, books, and journal Special Issues that have had far-reaching impact on developmental theory as well as science, policy, and practice related to child maltreatment, depression, mental retardation, and numerous other domains of development. Dante is the founding and current Editor of Development and Psychopathology.
Dante has received a number of awards, including the four highest honors of the Developmental Division of the American Psychological Association (APA): the G. Stanley Hall Award for Distinguished Contribution to Developmental Psychology in 2005; the Urie Bronfenbrenner Award for Lifetime Contribution to Developmental Psychology in the Service of Science and Society in 2006; and the Mentor Award in Developmental Psychology in 2008. Additionally, in 2004 he received the APA Senior Career Award for Distinguished Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest. In 2011, he was honored with the Society for Research in Child Development’s Distinguished Scientific Contributions to Child Development Award and was bestowed the AAAS Fellow Award by The American Association for the Advancement of Science. Dante is the recipient of the 2012 Klaus J. Jacobs Research Prize.


The Colorization of North America's Children: Science, Policy and Practice 

Speaker: Cynthia García Coll, Ph.D., Professor and Dean, Brown University and University of Puerto Rico
Chair: Carola Suárez-Orozco, University of California, Los Angeles
Thursday, April 18, 10:20 AM - 11:50 AM; Room 4C-2 (Washington Convention Center)

Abstract. Due to various sociodemographic tendencies in the 20th and 21st centuries, including disparate economic growth, increase globalization, changes in immigration policies and in population birthrates, the colorization of North America's children is taking place. This is no longer news, but the latest statistics are showing that these processes are taking place much faster than predicted. What are the consequences of these demographic tendencies for how we conduct research on understanding basic developmental processes as well as environmental inputs that operate? How should we use research to inform policies and practices for the emerging majority of children? In this talk I will review the historical record of theoretical paradigms and research practices that have been used to study these populations and their shortcomings as well as the failures of policies and practices based on these frameworks. I will use our most recent research on the Immigrant Paradox to exemplify a paradigm shift that will provide for more relevant research and more effective policies and practices to support not only our science but our youth.

Biography. Cynthia García Coll is the Charles Pitts Robinson and John Palmer Barstow Professor of Education, Psychology and Pediatrics at Brown University (on leave) and Dean of Graduate Programs and Research at the College of Natural Sciences at the University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras campus. She received her PhD in Personality and Developmental Psychology from Harvard University in 1981. She has published extensively on the sociocultural influences on child development with particular emphasis on at-risk and minority populations. She has served on the editorial boards of Child Development, Development and Psychopathology, Infant Behavior and Development, Infancy, Human Development and Developmental Psychology (Editor). She served on the SRCD Governing Council from 1996-2002 and is currently President of the Society for the Study of Human Development and Chair of the WT Grant Scholars Selection Committee. Dr. Garcia Coll was the recipient of the 2009 SRCD’s Cultural and Contextual Contributions to Child Development award and the 2011 Lectureship Award of the Society for Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics. Her current research seeks to document and explain immigrant pathways in education and risky behaviors as evidenced by U.S. children and adolescents.


Human Language: How Brain Measures Advance Theories of Learning and Development

Speaker: Patricia K. Kuhl, Co-Director, Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences, University of Washington
Chair: Richard N. Aslin, University of Rochester
Friday, April 19, 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM; Room 4C-2 (Washington Convention Center)

Abstract. Neuroimaging of the infant brain is advancing our understanding of humans’ capacity for language. I will describe new methods for co-registering structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI), and functional brain activity recorded by Magnetoencephalography (MEG) in young infants while they listen to speech. These measures allow us to test specific hypotheses about the brain mechanisms underlying early speech processing. One hypothesis under test is that early in development, infants’ statistical learning and computational skills for speech are ‘gated’ by the social brain. This work is also leading to the identification of biomarkers that may allow early diagnosis of autism. Language provides an excellent model for linking brain and behavior to illuminate child development.

Biography. Dr. Patricia K. Kuhl holds the Bezos Family Foundation Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and is Co-Director of the UW Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences, Director of the University of Washington’s NSF Science of Learning Center, and Professor of Speech and Hearing Sciences at the University of Washington in Seattle. She is internationally recognized for her research on early language and bilingual brain development, and studies that show how young children learn. She presented her work at two White House conferences (Clinton White House in 1997 and Bush White House in 2001). Dr. Kuhl is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Rodin Academy, and the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters, and is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Acoustical Society of America, the American Psychological Society, and the Cognitive Science Society. Dr. Kuhl was awarded the Silver Medal of the Acoustical Society of America in 1997. She received the University of Washington’s Faculty Lectureship Award in 1998. In 2005, she was awarded the Kenneth Craik Research Award from Cambridge University. In 2007, Dr. Kuhl was awarded the University of Minnesota’s Outstanding Achievement Award. In Paris in 2008, Dr. Kuhl was awarded the Gold Medal of the Acoustical Society of America (American Institute of Physics) for her work on early learning and brain development. In 2010, Dr. Kuhl was elected to the National Academy of Sciences. In November 2011 in Paris, Dr. Kuhl was awarded the IPSEN Foundation’s Jean-Louis Signoret Neuropsychology Prize. Dr. Kuhl is co-author of The Scientist in the Crib: Minds, Brains, and How Children Learn (Harper Collins). Dr. Kuhl’s TED talk can be viewed at: http://www.ted.com/talks/patricia_kuhl_the_linguistic_genius_of_babies.html


Modern Mediation Analysis

Speaker: David P. MacKinnon, Ph.D., Foundation Professor, Department of Psychology, Arizona State University
Chair: Laurie Chassin, Arizona State University
Friday, April 19, 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM; Room 4C-2 (Washington Convention Center)

Abstract. Mediating variables have a long and important history in theoretical and applied psychology because they describe how and why two variables are related.  The purpose of this presentation is to describe the questions mediation analysis can answer and how mediating variables differ from moderators, confounders, and covariates. Examples of mediation are provided including its use in the study of early experiences on later development and the identification of the critical ingredients in intervention programs for children. The statistical analysis of the single and multiple mediator models are used to demonstrate several controversial issues in significance testing and confidence interval estimation.   Recent results on the best method to assess mediation are summarized. New models for longitudinal mediation and approaches to investigate assumptions of the mediation model are described. The presentation ends with future directions in mediation theory and statistical analysis.  

Biography. David MacKinnon is a Foundation Professor in the Psychology Department at Arizona State University.  He received the Ph.D. in measurement and psychometrics from UCLA in 1986.   He was an Assistant Professor of Research at the University of Southern California from 1986 to 1990. Dr. MacKinnon received the 2007 Outstanding Graduate Mentor Award at Arizona State University.  In 2011 he received the Nan Tobler Award from the Society for Prevention Research for his 2008 book on statistical mediation analysis. He has served on federal review committees including a 5-year term on the Epidemiology and Prevention review committee. He is on the editorial board of Prevention Science and Psychological Methods.  Dr. MacKinnon has been principal investigator on several National Institute on Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse and National Institute on Drug Abuse grants.  His primary interest is in the area of statistical methods to assess how prevention and treatment programs achieve their effects.


Low-Income Children’s Self-Regulation: Scientific Inquiry for Social Change

Speaker: C. Cybele Raver, Professor, Department of Applied Psychology, New York University
Chair: Hirokazu Yoshikawa, Graduate School of Education, Harvard University
Thursday, April 18, 2:20 PM - 3:50 PM; Room 4C-2 (Washington Convention Center)

Abstract. Over 21% of children in the U.S. today are poor with the income gap between our nation’s richest and poorest children widening dramatically, over time. Raver will discuss ways that children’s executive function and emotional self-regulation serve as likely mediating mechanisms through which poverty has deleterious consequences for their later life outcomes. Raver will present findings from her own and others’ field experiments and longitudinal studies to consider ways that self-regulation in childhood is environmentally modifiable. Drawing from traditions of policy analysis, developmental science, and prevention science, Raver will outline several ways that scientific inquiry in human development might be strengthened to support social action. New directions for theory and methods in the study of self-regulation, poverty-related risk, and prevention will be discussed.

Biography. C. Cybele Raver serves as Vice Provost of Academic, Faculty and Research Affairs at NYU. She also maintains an active program of research, examining the mechanisms that support children's self-regulation in the contexts of poverty and social policy. Raver and her research team currently conduct CSRP, a federally-funded RCT intervention and she regularly advises local and federal government agencies and foundations on promoting school readiness among low-income children. Raver has received a William T. Grant Faculty Scholar award as well as support from the Spencer Foundation, the MacArthur Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, and the National Science Foundation. Raver earned her Ph.D. in developmental psychology from Yale University.


Leveraging Knowledge from the Developmental Sciences for Improving Modern STEM Education

Speaker: Philip Uri Treisman, Professor of Mathematics, Professor of Public Affairs, and Director, The Charles A. Dana Center at The University of Texas at Austin
Chair: Richard M. Lerner, Tufts University
Thursday, April 18, 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM; Room 4C-2 (Washington Convention Center)

Abstract. Compelling economic forecasts indicate that our country will need to produce, over the next decade, one million more college graduates in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields of study. Furthermore, there is increasingly broad recognition among STEM thought leaders that the health of their disciplines depends on developing a next generation of STEM professionals that reflects the full diversity of our society. The federal government, the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology, major foundations, and professional organizations are calling for, or are creating, major initiatives to ensure our future STEM capabilities. What do the architects of these programs and initiatives need from the developmental sciences? What is known, but not applied? What questions about the development of student agency, commitment to learning, productive and healthful disciplinary and pro-social behaviors need to be pursued if we are to increase the likelihood of success in STEM education? And finally, as the use of large-scale psychological interventions grounded in the developmental sciences increases, what ethical safeguards should be in place, and by whom should they be developed?

Biography. Philip “Uri” Treisman is professor of mathematics and of public affairs at The University of Texas at Austin, where he is the founder and director of the University's Charles A. Dana Center. He is a senior advisor to the Aspen Institute’s Urban Superintendents’ Network and serves on the boards of the New Teacher Project, Education Resource Strategies and the Center for Community College Student Engagement. He recently served on the STEM working group of the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology and on the Carnegie Corporation--Institute for Advanced Study Commission on Mathematics and Science Education. He served on the AACC 21st -Century Commission on the Future of Community Colleges and serves on the AACC Implementation Team. Uri was named a MacArthur Fellow in 1992 for his work on nurturing minority student high achievement in college mathematics and 2006 Scientist of the Year by the Harvard Foundation of Harvard University for his outstanding contributions to mathematics.

Invited Symposia

Interventions for Children and Youth in Low- and Middle-Income (LAMI) Countries: Toward a Global Developmental Science

Chair: J. Lawrence Aber, Distinguished Professor of Applied Psychology and Public Policy, New York University
Discussants. Carly Tubbs, Ph.D. candidate, New York University and Alice Wuermli, Ph.D. candidate, University of California, Davis
Thursday, April 18, 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM; Room 4C-2 (Washington Convention Center)

Integrative Statement. Historically, the rigorous scientific study of child development evolved over its first century primarily in Europe and North America. Similarly, developmental approaches to the design and evaluation of programs and policies to enhance child well-being were concentrated in high income countries, especially in North America. But the vast majority of the world’s children live in low- and middle-income countries. International development agencies, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and governments are currently engaged in systematic efforts to promote healthy child development by drawing on individual, family, community, and national strengths while addressing the most critical threats to development that occur in such contexts. But such efforts have yet to fully incorporate insights from developmental science and related disciplines that have the potential to augment their effectiveness.
     This symposium reports the highlights of SRCD’s pre-conference on how designing and evaluating interventions for children and youth in low- and middle-income countries offer both great challenges but also exciting new opportunities to build a truly global basic and applied developmental science.

Biography. Lawrence Aber is Distinguished Professor of Applied Psychology and Public Policy at New York University, and board chair of its Institute of Human Development and Social Change. He earned his Ph.D. from Yale University and an A.B. from Harvard University. An internationally recognized expert in child development and social policy, his basic research examines the influence of poverty and violence, at the family and community levels, on the social, emotional, behavioral, cognitive and academic development of children and youth.  Dr. Aber also designs and conducts rigorous evaluations of innovative programs and policies for children, youth and families, such as violence prevention, literacy development, welfare reform and comprehensive services initiatives. Currently, Dr. Aber is conducting research on the combined effects of poverty and HIV/AIDS on household and child well-being (South Africa) and a school-randomized trial of a social-emotional learning intervention (Democratic Republic of Congo).

Presentation 1 - Opportunities and Strategies to Promote Healthy Development in Low- and Middle-Income Countries
Suman Verma, Punjab University, India

Presentation 2 - Designing, Implementing and Evaluating Interventions in Low- and Middle-Income Countries
J. Lawrence Aber, New York University

Presentation 3 - Conceptual and Methodological Challenges in Cross-disciplinary, Cross-professional, Cross-cultural, Cross-national Research
Anne C. Petersen, University of Michigan; Global Philanthropy Alliance


Single-Sex Education: Dysfunctional Segregation or Desirable Solution?

Chair: Rebecca S. Bigler, Professor of Psychology and Women’s and Gender Studies, University of Texas at Austin
Saturday, April 20, 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM; Room 4C-2 (Washington Convention Center)

Integrative Statement. Amendments to Title IX that were passed as part of the No Child Left Behind Act in 2006 made some forms of single-sex public education legal. Since that time, there have been increases in both public single-sex schools and single-sex classrooms within public coeducational schools. Furthermore, a large proportion of these single-sex programs appear to serve economically disadvantaged communities of color. Despite its increasing popularity, single-sex education remains controversial; no consensus has been reached about whether single-sex schooling leads to academic or psychological outcomes superior to those of coeducational schooling. The symposium brings together a group of leading scholars with backgrounds in diverse fields, including developmental science, education, sociology, and women’s and gender studies, to address the current state of the scientific basis for single-sex education policy and practice. Specifically, this symposium assembles four papers examining varied topics related to single sex public education, unified by a focus on core issues raised by the surging popularity of gender-segregated educational programming. The symposium begins with two papers that provide complementary and contrasting perspectives on issues of race, ethnicity, and single-sex schooling. The third paper provides a critical analysis of the mechanisms via which the gender composition of pupils’ classrooms may affect school outcomes. The final paper presents the results of two new meta-analyses of the literature on single-sex schooling.

Biography. Rebecca S. Bigler is Professor of Psychology and Women’s and Gender Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. She received a B.A. from Oberlin College and Ph.D. from The Pennsylvania State University before joining the faculty at UT-Austin in 1991. She studies the causes and consequences of social stereotyping and prejudice among children, with a particular focus on gender and racial attitudes. She is especially interested in contextual factors that serve to exaggerate or diminish children’s intergroup biases and has worked to develop and test intervention strategies aimed at reducing stereotyping and prejudice. She is currently the Executive Director of the American Council for CoEducational Schooling (ACCES).

Presentation 1 - Creating Developmentally Auspicious School Environments for Boys of Color
Oscar Barbarin, Tulane University

Presentation 2 - A Critical Analysis of Public Single-Sex Education for Low Income Students of Color
Sara Goodkind, University of Pittsburgh

Presentation 3 - When, Why, and How the Gender Composition of Classrooms Affects Students
Rebecca S. Bigler and Amy Roberson Hayes, University of Texas at Austin, and Lynn S. Liben, The Pennsylvania State University

Presentation 4 - The Efficacy of Single-Sex Schooling: Results from Two New Meta-Analyses
Amy Roberson Hayes, University of Texas at Austin (Presenter 1st Half) and Erin E. Pahlke, Whitman College (Presenter 2nd Half); Janet S. Hyde and Carlie Allison, University of Wisconsin; Margaret Signorella, Pennsylvania State University, Greater Allegheny Campus; Yidi Li, University of Michigan


Adaptive and Maladaptive Pathways of Immigrant Children and Youth: International Perspectives

Co-Chair: Natasha Cabrera, University of Maryland
Co-Chair: Frosso Motti-Stefanidi, University of Athens
Discussant: Carola Suarez-Orozco, University of California, Los Angeles
Saturday, April 20, 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM; Room 4C-3 (Washington Convention Center)

Integrative Statement. Immigrant youth’s adaptation is the focus of much debate among developmental and cultural researchers. Is immigrant status a developmental risk for adaptation?  It depends on several factors, including  the particular ethnic group, the host society, and significant individual differences  (e.g. Berry et al., 2006; Coll & Marks, 2011; Suarez-Orozco et al., 2008). Immigrant youth are faced not only with developmental and acculturative challenges, but also with contextual stresssors, such as poverty and discrimination, that strain the adaptation process (García-Coll et al., 1996). This diversity presents a challenge for researchers interested in the developmental trajectories of immigrant children across developmental periods. Understanding both the adaptive and maladaptive paths of immigrant children is central in promoting their positive adaptation.
     The papers in this panel center on immigrants‘ risk and resilience aspects of adaptation in three countries. These studies examine adaptation in terms of three core developmental tasks:academic achievement, peer competence, and conduct. The first paper from the US focuses on the longitudinal links between parental resources and immigrant children’s school readiness, an important precursor of academic achievement. The second paper from Greece focuses on immigrant adolescents’ peer group status in the classroom and examines initial levels and changes in peer nominations received by immigrant and nonimmigrant adolescents from in-group and out-group classmates. The third paper from Germany investigates the link between risk and protective factors in immigrant adolescents‘ conduct/misconduct and the changes in minor delinquency in immigrant groups. The discussant will comment on the studies in light of the international literature on immigrant youth adaptation.

Biography. Natasha J. Cabrera is Associate Professor in Human Development at the University of Maryland. Dr. Cabrera’s research, funded by National Institute of Child Development, focuses on: father involvement and children’s development; ethnic and cultural variations in fathering and mothering behaviors; family processes in a social and cultural context and children’s social development; and the mechanisms that link early experience to children’s school readiness. She has published in peer-reviewed journals on policy, methodology, theory and the implications of father involvement on child development. She is the co-editor of the Handbook of Father Involvement: Multidisciplinary Perspectives, Second Edition (Taylor & Francis, in press) and Latina/o Child Psychology and Mental Health: Vol 1: Early to Middle Childhood: Development and Context and Vol 2: Adolescent Development (Praeger, 2011). She is the recipient of the National Council and Family Relations award for Best Research Article regarding men in families in 2009.

Biography. Frosso Motti-Stefanidi is Professor of Psychology of the University of Athens, Greece. She received her B.A. with distinction Summa Cum Laude, and her PhD from the Institute of Child Development, University of Minnesota. In 2005 she received the Distinguished International Alumni Award from the College of Education and Human Development of the University of Minnesota. Her area of research is mainly in developmental psychopathology. She currently studies risk and resilience in immigrant adolescents. She is author of over 90 papers and chapters in peer-reviewed journals and edited books in Greek and English, and of two books in Greek. She has served as Chair of the Department of Psychology, University of Athens (2005-2008). She was the President (2008-2010) of the European Association of Personality Psychology, and the Secretary of the European Society for Developmental Psychology (2009-2011). She is currently the President-Elect (2011-2013) of the European Society for Developmental Psychology.

Presentation 1 - Latino Children’s School Readiness: A Mediational Model Assessing the Influence of Parenting, Socioeconomic Status, and Immigration Status
Natasha Cabrera1, Vanessa Wight2 and Jay Fagan1
1 University of Maryland, College Park, 2 Columbia University

Presentation 2 - Immigrant Status and Acculturation Effects on Peer Nominations: A Multilevel, Longitudinal Study in Greek Middle Schools
Frosso Motti-Stefanidi, University of Athens, Greece and Jens B. Asendorpf, Humboldt University, Germany

Presentation 3 - Minor Delinquency and Immigration: A Longitudinal Study Among Male Adolescents
Peter F. Titzmann and Rainer K. Silbereisen, Friedrich-Schiller-University of Jena, Germany; Gustavo S. Mesch, University of Haifa, Israel


Sleep in Adolescence: Pathways, Targets and Treatments

Chair: Allison G. Harvey, Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley
Saturday, April 20, 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM; Room 4C-2 (Washington Convention Center)

Integrative Statement. Lack of sleep exacts a weighty negative toll on the lives of too many children and teenagers. Among youth, inadequate sleep and sleep disorders have been linked to poorer health, poorer academic performance, poorer self-regulation, greater use of substances, greater tendency for impulsivity, more depression and anxiety, greater emotional instability and more aggressive, risky and antisocial behavior. Hence, a public health priority is to identify mechanisms that contribute to sleep problems and develop and test interventions to improve sleep. The good news is that evidence is starting to accrue that sleep problems can be readily addressed with a range of powerful and simple psychosocial-behavioral interventions. Within an overarching developmental framework, the speakers in this symposium present new findings that elucidate mechanisms contributing to sleep problems in youth and provide empirical data on novel treatments. We focus on sleep in adolescence because of the interesting mix of biological and social/psychological contributors. Biologically, the onset of puberty triggers a change toward a distinct evening preference in a proportion of teens. Also, across adolescence there is a temporal gap between the development of brain regions involved in behavior regulation and cognitive control and the brain regions controlling emotional processing and behaviors associated with reward/punishment. Unfortunately these are same regions that are most sensitive to insufficient sleep. Socially and psychologically there are so many impediments to sleep, including the use of social media in bed, the growing importance of peer relationships and first romantic relationships (and the associated sleep-interfering worry-rumination).

Biography. Allison Harvey is a Professor of Clinical Psychology at the University of California, Berkeley. After completing her training in Sydney, Australia, Dr. Harvey joined the faculty in the Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford. In 2004 she moved to Cal. Dr. Harvey's team aim to develop more effective treatments for psychiatric and health problems by (a) applying a multi-systems and mechanisms-focused framework in which basic science findings on cognitive, affective, biological, behavioral and developmental contributors are used as sources for deriving novel interventions and (b) intervention research is used to develop hypotheses about and/or confirm mechanisms. Their major current focus is sleep problems in adolescence. Dr. Harvey has been the recipient of numerous awards including an Honorary Doctorate from the University of Orebro, Sweden. Her research is funded by NIMH and NICHD. Dr. Harvey serves on numerous editorial boards and she is an Associate Editor for SLEEP.

Presentation 1 - Double Trouble? The effects of sleep deprivation and evening chronotype on emotional risk in adolescents
Allison G. Harvey, University of California, Berkeley

Presentation 2 - Targeted Behavioral Therapy (TBT) for Children with Generalized Anxiety Disorder: An Integrated Treatment of Sleep and Anxiety
Candice A. Alfano, University of Houston

Presentation 3 - Treating Sleep in Early Adolescents with Anxiety: Implications for Improving Affective Development
Dana McMakin, University of Pittsburgh

Presentation 4 - Treating Insomnia to Improve Youth Depression Outcomes: Pilot Results
Greg Clarke, Center for Health Research, Kaiser, Oregon


Equity & Justice in Developmental Science

Chair: Martin D. Ruck, Associate Professor, The Graduate Center, City University of New York
Friday, April 19, 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM; Room 4C-3 (Washington Convention Center)

Integrative Statement. Equity and justice are important goals for healthy child development and are increasingly a focus of research in developmental science.  The need for addressing issues of equity and justice has become especially important as the world becomes increasingly global, and as children and young people are residing in ever more heterogeneous communities.  This invited paper symposium, organized by the SRCD Committee on Equity and Justice, addresses the question “Why are equity and justice critical to developmental science?”  Speakers will consider this question with respect to distinct conceptual perspectives, methodologies, and populations.  Discussion will focus on the overarching themes arising from each speaker’s perspective as related to issues of equity and justice in children and youth.

Biography. Martin D. Ruck is an Associate Professor of Psychology and Urban Education at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York.  His work examines the overall process of cognitive socialization—at the intersection of race, ethnicity and class—in terms of children’s and adolescents’ thinking about human rights, educational opportunity, and social justice.  Currently, he is investigating how children’s perceptions of social exclusion and discrimination are influenced by their social experiences and interpretations of rights and justice.  His research has appeared in Applied Developmental Science, Child Development, Group Processes and Intergroup Relations, Journal of Adolescence, Journal of Applied Social Psychology, Journal of Early Adolescence, Journal of Research on Adolescence, and Journal of Youth and Adolescence.  He has recently extended his work on young people’s perceptions of their rights to the U.K. and South Africa.

Presentation 1 - Motives, methods, measures, and misspecifications: Queer adolescents and the science of equity
Stephen T. Russell, University of Arizona

Presentation 2 - Equity in childhood: Social-moral reasoning about social exclusion and group dynamics
Adam Rutland, Goldsmiths, University of London, UK

Presentation 3 - Developmental Implication of Growing up in the Shadows of Undocumented Status: Equal Opportunities for All?
Carola Suárez-Orozco, University of California, Los Angeles

Presentation 4 - The effects of school diversity on adolescents' experiences of racial discrimination and psychological adjustment
Tiffany Yip, Fordham University


Intervening in School Bullying: The Critical Role of Context

Chair: Christina Salmivalli, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology, University of Turku, Finland
Saturday, April 20, 2:20 PM - 3:50 PM; Room 4C-3 (Washington Convention Center)

Integrative Statement. The role of context has been strongly emphasized in recent research and interventions against bullying. Contextual factors influencing the emergence and maintenance of bullying behavior have been studied at multiple levels, such as dyads, peer cliques, classrooms, schools, and – to a lesser extent – whole societies. Changing the classroom or school context, instead of the characteristics of individual children has become a prevailing approach in preventing bullying, although it is not clear which elements of the context should be targeted and how. Finally, bullying prevention programs that were proven to be effective in one country have often produced little or no effects in replication studies elsewhere. More research on the generalizability of evidence-based programs across (culturally) diverse groups, countries, and contexts is therefore needed.
     The symposium aims to provide a better understanding of the possibilities and challenges provided by context when intervening in bullying. The first presentation focuses on the mediators of the effects of KiVa antibullying program, with special attention at the classroom- and school-level mechanisms of change. The second presentation provides preliminary findings regarding the implementation and effects of the KiVa antibullying program in a new context, the Netherlands. The third presentation tests whether a relatively simple classroom seating arrangement intervention can lead to reductions in bullying. The fourth and final presentation brings up the challenge of promoting peace and reducing bullying in contexts with high levels of violent conflict.

Biography. Christina Salmivalli, Ph.D., is a Professor of Psychology at the University of Turku, Finland. Together with her team, she has done school based research on bullying and its prevention for over 20 years. Prof Salmivalli is the principal investigator of the evaluation of KiVa antibullying program, which has been awarded nationally as well as internationally. Salmivalli has published numerous research articles, reviews, book chapters and books on the topic of school bullying. She has been in charge for several large-scale projects funded by the Academy of Finland and other funding organizations in Finland and at the European level.

Presentation 1 - Student-, Classroom- and School-level Mechanisms of the KiVa Antibullying Program
Silja Saarento1, Aaron Boulton2, and Christina Salmivalli1,
1 University of Turku, Finland, 2 University of Kansas, U.S.A.

Presentation 2 - KiVa in the Netherlands: Design, Implementation and Selected Findings
Rene Veenstra, Gijs Huitsing, Femke Munniksma, Beau Oldenburg, and Rozemarijn Van der Ploeg, University of Groningen, The Netherlands

Presentation 3 - Changing Classroom Context to Reduce Bullying and Peer Victimization
Antonius H. N. Cillessen, Henrike J. Klip, Yvonne H. M. van den Berg, and Eliane Segers,
Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands

Presentation 4 - Evaluation of Classrooms in Peace in Mexico and Colombia: The Challenge of Promoting Peace in Violent Environments
Enrique Chaux1, Madeleine Barrera1, Melissa Colter2, Rosalía Castro2 and Cynthia Villareal2,
1 Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia, 2 Via Education, Monterrey, México


Cross-Cultural and Interdisciplinary Research: Studying Diverse Child Developmental Pathways Around the World

Chair: Thomas  S. Weisner, Professor of Anthropology, Departments of Psychiatry and Anthropology, University of California, Los Angeles
Thursday, April 18, 4:10 PM - 5:40 PM; Room 4C-2 (Washington Convention Center)

Integrative Statement. There are remarkably diverse developmental pathways for children around the world. Understanding them often requires interdisciplinary research, collaboration with parents and children in those communities, and integrating qualitative, quantitative and biological methods.  Such research can radically challenge what our field imagines as the normative range of variation for children’s development. If our studies only come from Western developed societies, laboratory contexts, or from single disciplines and methods, we easily can miss the many successful life-ways for achieving child and family wellbeing around the world.  Cultural and multidisciplinary research is also essential to discover and confirm universal processes and common mechanisms in child development and families, amidst the world’s diverse developmental contexts.  For good analytic and practical reasons, bracketing out context, using single methods, using a local or mono-cultural sample, and assuming linear relationships of course are valuable and/or necessary approaches in developmental science.  But the world of children and families is not linear and additive, and bracketing in diverse cultural and naturalistic context leads to findings that matter for children’s development which could not be discovered otherwise.  The speakers in this invited symposium exemplify these long-standing empirical and theoretical traditions in the study of human development.  Their research includes biocultural studies of health, stress, and human development; cultural comparative work on infancy, and on the connections between fertility decline, literacy, and maternal behavior; research on the shared role of individual and cultural processes in children’s collaboration and learning; and comparative studies of mothering and early childhood development.

Biography. Thomas S. Weisner is Prof. of Anthropology, Departments of Psychiatry (Center for Culture and Health) and Anthropology at UCLA.  His research and teaching interests are in culture and human development; medical, psychological and cultural studies of families and children at risk; mixed methods; and evidence-informed policy. He has done research with the Abaluyia of Kenya, native Hawaiians, countercultural US families, US families with children with disabilities, families with children with autism in India, working poor families in the US, and Mexican-American adolescents in Los Angeles.  His BA is from Reed College and PhD in Anthropology and Social Relations from Harvard. He is the co-author of Higher Ground: New Hope for the Working Poor and Their Children (2007) (with Greg Duncan and Aletha Huston); editor, Discovering successful pathways in children's development (2005); and co-editor, African families and the crisis of social change (with Candice Bradley and Phil Kilbride) (1997). 

Presentation 1 - Margaret Mead and Developmental Psychology: Critical Reflections
Robert A. LeVine, Graduate School of Education, Harvard University

Presentation 2 - Learning about the Roles of Individual and Community in Human Development through Interdisciplinary Research
Barbara Rogoff, University of California, Santa Cruz

Presentation 3 - Styles of Mothering in the “Children of Different Worlds” Study:  An Early Childhood Researcher Revisits Issues of Parental Engagement
Carolyn Edwards, University of Nebraska, Lincoln

Presentation 4 - Human Development as a Biocultural Project: Insights from Comparative Research
Carol Worthman, Emory University


Executive Function: Basic Science to Intervention

Chair: Philip David Zelazo, Nancy M. and John E. Lindahl Professor, Institute of Child Development, University of Minnesota
Discussant: Adele Diamond, University of British Columbia and BC Children’s Hospital
Thursday, April 18, 10:20 AM - 11:50 AM; Room 4C-3 (Washington Convention Center)

Integrative Statement. Individual differences in executive function (EF) skills in childhood predict a wide range of important developmental outcomes, and EF is increasingly a target of therapeutic, remedial, and universal interventions.  The talks in this symposium address recent advances in neuroscience, including research on the prolonged development of EF-related neural systems (e.g., involving prefrontal cortex), and discuss the implications of this research for the design and implementation of effective ways to support the healthy development of EF.  Research on prefrontal cortical structure and function, for example, has sharpened our understanding of the neurocognitive processes underlying EF that may be targeted for training.  Research on brain development and neural plasticity suggests that periods of relatively rapid change in EF and EF-related neural systems are periods during which EF-related neural systems show heightened sensitivity to environmental influences. Following a brief introduction that presents a view of neurocognitive development as a dynamic process of adaptation wherein increasingly efficient hierarchically arranged neural systems are constructed in a largely use-dependent fashion, three of the leading researchers in developmental cognitive neuroscience will show how neuroscience has informed their ideas about EF interventions. Silvia Bunge (Berkeley), Yuko Munakata (Boulder), and Stephanie Carlson (Minnesota) have each added to our understanding of the nature of EF and its development through neuroscientific investigations while also exploring the implications for treatment, training, and even best practices for teaching and parenting. Adele Diamond (UBC), whose own pioneering research has spanned both the basic neuroscience of EF and EF interventions, serves as discussant.

Biography. Philip David Zelazo (PhD, Yale ’93) is the Nancy M. and John E. Lindahl Professor at the Institute of Child Development, University of Minnesota.  From 1992-2007, he taught at the University of Toronto, where he held the Canada Research Chair in Developmental Neuroscience. He is a Fellow of APA, APS, and the Mind and Life Institute; he is President of the Jean Piaget Society; and he is a member of several editorial boards, including Child Development; Monographs of the SRCD; Development and Psychopathology; Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience; Cognitive Development; Emotion; and Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. He was the co-editor of The Cambridge Handbook of Consciousness (Zelazo, Moscovitch, & Thompson, 2007), and is the editor of the 2-volume Oxford Handbook of Developmental Psychology.

Presentation 1 - A Neuroscientific Perspective on the Cognitive Training of Executive Function
Silvia Bunge, University of California, Berkeley

Presentation 2 - Building on Theory to Improve Executive Function: The Case of Inhibitory Control
Yuko Munakata, University of Colorado, Boulder

Presentation 3 - Reflection Training to Promote Executive Function in Preschool Children
Stephanie M. Carlson, University of Minnesota

Memorial Symposium

Honoring the Legacy of Nicki R. Crick

Chair: Kenneth A. Dodge, Duke University
Thursday, April 18, 4:10 PM - 5:40 PM; Room 4C-3 (Washington Convention Center)

Biography. Nicki R. Crick passed away peacefully on October 28, 2012 at the age of 54 after a brief but courageous battle with cancer. Crick was a Distinguished McKnight University Professor and Irving B. Harris Professor of Child Psychology at the Institute of Child Development, University of Minnesota.

Nicki obtained a bachelor’s degree in psychology and a master’s degree in human development and family studies at Purdue University. In 1992, she earned her doctorate in clinical psychology from Vanderbilt University. Nicki spent five years as an assistant professor in human development and family studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign before joining the faculty at the University of Minnesota in 1996. Nicki was a William T. Grant Faculty Scholar and was the Director of the Institute of Child Development from January 2005 to June 2011.

Nicki Crick is internationally known for her innovative research on relational forms of aggression. Relational aggression, defined as behaviors that harm others via damage to relationships, includes acts such as using social exclusion or spreading malicious rumors. Girls are more likely to engage in relational than physical forms of aggression. Crick’s research documented the harmful consequences of relational aggression for victims and perpetrators, and as a result aggression researchers have expanded their studies to include a more gender-balanced examination of the causes and consequences of aggressive conduct.

The scope of Nicki Crick’s work is far-reaching. She authored over 90 research articles and chapters. Several of her papers (e.g., 1995 publication on relational aggression; 1994 review of the social information processing patterns in aggressive youth) are among the most influential papers in the field of developmental science. Nicki Crick received numerous awards for her scientific contributions, including the Distinguished Scientific Award for Early Career Contributions to Psychology from the American Psychological Association and the Boyd McCandless Young Scientist Award from Division 7 (Developmental Psychology) of the American Psychological Association.

(Dianna Murray-Close, 2012)

Presentation 1 - Multilevel Perspectives on Potential Precursors to Borderline Personality in Maltreated Children
Dante Cicchetti and Kathryn Hecht, Institute of Child Development, University of Minnesota, Fred A. Rogosch, Mt. Hope Family Center, University of Rochester

Presentation 2 - Psychophysiological Processes in the Development of Relational Aggression
Dianna (Annie) K. Murray-Close, University of Vermont

Presentation 3 - Socio-Cultural Perspectives on the Bully/Victim Phenomenon
David Schwartz, University of Southern California, Jamie M. Ostrov, University at Buffalo

Presentation 4 - Peer Relationships and Psychopathology in War-Affected Ugandan Youth
Katherine Hecht, Peter Ralston, Nicki R. Crick, Dante Cicchetti, University of Minnesota

Invited Views by Two

Translational Social Neuroscience: What Can We Learn From 'Emerging' Autism?  

Moderator: Connie L. Kasari, University of California, Los Angeles
Saturday, April 20, 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM; Room 4C-3 (Washington Convention Center)

Presentation 1 – Neural Developmental Genomic, Cellular and Cortical Organization Defects That Lead to Autism
Panelist 1 - Eric Courchesne, Ph.D., Director, UC San Diego Autism Center, Department of Neuroscience, University of California San Diego School of Medicine

Abstract. The early neural defects that cause autism remain unknown, but their signature is likely to be most evident during the first years of life when clinical symptoms are emerging. This lecture highlights the many new findings about the neural and genomic abnormalities in autism at young ages.  It contrasts brain pathology at young ages versus adult ages in autism.  Evidence supports three phases of brain development pathology in autism: a phase of early brain overgrowth in some percentage of toddlers, then arrest of growth and finally degeneration in some percentage of cases.  Early brain overgrowth is present in a large percentage of toddlers with autism and it is a key to uncovering the neural bases for emergence of autistic behavior as well as identifying causes. We discovered a 67% excess neuron number in prefrontal cortex in autism, a region important for social, communication, language and cognitive functioning. This striking defect is one cause of early brain overgrowth in autism. We have also discovered abnormal functioning of specific gene networks in prefrontal cortex, and these abnormalities help explain aspects of prenatal and postnatal neural maldevelopment in autism. The resulting maldevelopment of cortical patterning and wiring may lead to exuberant local and short distance cortical interactions that impede the function of long-distance interactions between brain regions. Since large-scale networks underlie socio-emotional and communication functions, such alterations in brain architecture could relate to the early clinical manifestations in autism.  As such, autism may additionally provide unique insight into genetic and developmental processes that shape early neural wiring patterns and make possible higher-order social, emotional and communication functions that epitomize humans.

Biography.  Eric Courchesne, Professor of Neurosciences in the School of Medicine at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) and Director of the UCSD Autism Center. He is a leading expert on brain structural and functional abnormalities associated with autism. His Autism Center has identified biological and behavioral markers of autism that will allow for earlier diagnosis and treatment by integrating behavioral, developmental, genetic, neuroanatomical and neurofunctional findings. MRI studies have identified structures that are abnormal at infancy in autism and elucidated patterns of abnormal growth from infancy through adulthood. His MRI study of longitudinal development in ASD during the first years of life was named one of the Top Ten Autism Research Studies of 2010 by the IACC. FMRI studies have established links between autistic symptoms in infants and toddlers and the brain sites responsible for them. Studies of brain tissue have discovered in children with ASD 67% excess numbers of prefrontal neurons, dysregulation of genetic mechanisms that control neuron numbers and patterning, and cellular and laminar defects in the frontal cortex. His research has been published in JAMA, Science, Lancet and the New England Journal of Medicine and is supported through grants from NIH, Autism Speaks, the Simons Foundation and the Emch Foundation.

Presentation 2 – Redefining Autism: Developmental Derailment of Normative Processes of Socialization
Panelist 2 – Ami Klin, Director, Marcus Autism Center, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, GRA Eminent Scholar Professor & Chief, Division of Autism & Related Disorders, Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine, Emory Center for Translational Social Neuroscience

Abstract. An estimated 300 to 500 genes may impact etiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) but no single molecular marker defines the diagnosis. Instead, diagnosis depends upon the emergence of overt symptoms of social disability, which in turn depend upon deviations from social-cognitive behaviors that are not typically present until after infancy. In this presentation, ASD is re-defined as the behavioral outcomes resulting from progressive derailments of foundational mechanisms of socialization, a process that 1. begins from as early as the 2nd to 3rd month of life, and 2. may be multi-factorial in its etiology. A hypothesis is outlined according to which heterogeneity of syndrome presentation is at least in part determined by ‘dosage’ and ‘timing’ of the early derailment of processes that would typically canalize social development. More speculatively, it is also hypothesized that deviations in early social experience also progressively impact on profiles of gene expression and brain specialization.

Biography. Ami Klin, Ph.D. is the director of the Marcus Autism Center and Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Professor and Chief, Division of Autism and Related Disorders at the Emory University School of Medicine. He obtained his Ph.D. from the University of London, and completed clinical and research post-doctoral fellowships at the Yale Child Study Center. He directed the Autism Program at the Yale Child Study Center, Yale University School of Medicine until 2010, where he was the Harris Professor of Child Psychology & Psychiatry. The Marcus Autism Center, an NIH-designated Autism Center of Excellence, is one of the largest centers of clinical science in the country, providing a broad range of diagnostic and treatment services, and an interdisciplinary program of research in clinical science. Dr. Klin’s primary research activities focus on the development of social mind and brain, and on various other aspects of autism from infancy through adulthood. 


Starting Points and Change in Spatial Development: Contrasting Perspectives

Moderator: Lynn S. Liben, The Pennsylvania State University
Friday, April 19, 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM; Room 4C-3 (Washington Convention Center)

Presentation 1 – Adaptive Combination in Spatial Development
Panelist 1 - Nora S. Newcombe, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology, James H. Glackin Distinguished Faculty Fellow, Temple University

Abstract. The world contains rich spatial information, in two broad classes: external (or allocentric) and internal (or egocentric). Allocentric cues include contours, such as the course of a streambed; proximal landmarks, such as a traffic cone; distal landmarks, such as a church spire; and gradients, such as the slope of the terrain. Egocentric cues establish spatial position from records of self-movement. Maintaining spatial orientation requires the flexible selection and weighting of these varied sources of information. This combination process changes across development. Infants come equipped with an ability to judge magnitude in an approximate way, as well as with the ability to perform a few kinds of motion. They modify their use of spatial information in a Bayesian fashion, as increased motor control augments their experience, and as they accumulate feedback from spatial search. Such reweighting, based on adaptive value, is contrasted with the geometric module approach.

Biography. Nora S. Newcombe is Professor of Psychology and James H. Glackin Distinguished Faculty Fellow at Temple University. Her Ph.D. is from Harvard University. Her research focuses on spatial cognition and development, as well as the development of autobiographical and episodic memory. Dr. Newcombe is the author of numerous chapters, articles, and books, including Making Space with Janellen Huttenlocher (published by the MIT Press, 2000). Her work has been recognized by several awards, including the George A. Miller Award and the G. Stanley Hall Award. She is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and of the Society of Experimental Psychologists. She has served as Editor of the Journal of Experimental Psychology: General and Associate Editor of Psychological Bulletin, as well as on many grant panels and advisory boards. She is currently Principal Investigator of the NSF-funded Spatial Intelligence and Learning Center.

Presentation 2 – Natural Geometry
Panelist 2 – Elizabeth S. Spelke, Harvard University

Abstract. How do we develop abstract concepts like seven, good, or triangle?  Some have argued that these concepts must be innate.  Others argue that they can be constructed by general-purpose learning mechanisms.  Research on geometrical concepts suggests a third view.  There are distinct cognitive systems in the minds of humans and other animals, shared by educated adults and inexperienced infants, that capture different aspects of geometry.  These systems were shaped, over evolution, to solve basic problems faced by humans and other animals.  One system uses distance and directional relationships in the navigable surface layout to determine one's position and heading.  A second system uses angle and length relationships among the parts of objects to determine an object's kind or function.  Children develop abstract and general geometrical concepts by using symbols, such as language and drawings, to combine productively the information captured by these systems.

Biography. Elizabeth Spelke teaches at Harvard University, where she is the Marshall L. Berkman Professor of Psychology. She previously taught at MIT, Cornell University, and the University of Pennsylvania after studying at Harvard, Yale and Cornell Universities.

Spelke studies the origins and nature of knowledge of objects, actions, number, geometry, and social relationships through studies of human infants, children, human adults and non-human animals.

A member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, her honors include the Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award of the American Psychological Association, the William James Award of the American Psychological Society, the IPSEN prize in neuronal plasticity, and the Jean Nicod Prize.


A Tale of Two Species: Characterizing and Intervening on Early Adverse Experience Effects in Humans and Monkeys

Moderator: Megan R. Gunnar, University of Minnesota
Thursday, April 18, 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM; Room 4C-3 (Washington Convention Center)

Presentation 1 – Using Translational Neuroscience to Improve the Lives of Foster and Adopted Children 
Panelist 1 – Philip A. Fisher, Senior Scientist, Oregon Social Learning Center, Professor of Psychology, University of Oregon

Biography. Dr. Philip Fisher is a Professor of Psychology (clinical) at the University of Oregon and a Senior Scientist at the Oregon Social Learning Center (OSLC). He is also Science Director for the National Forum on Early Childhood Policy and Programs and a Senior Fellow at the Center on the Developing Child, both based at Harvard University. Dr. Fisher’s work on children in foster care and the child welfare system includes (a) basic research characterizing the effects of early stress on neurobiological systems such as the HPA axis and areas of the prefrontal cortex involved in executive functioning; (b) the development of preventive interventions, including the Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care Program for Preschoolers (MTFC-P) and the Kids in Transition to School Program (KITS); and (c) the dissemination of evidence-based practice in community settings. His work has been funded by a number of institutes of the National Institutes of Health, including NIDA, NIMH, and NICHD, as well as the U.S. Department of Education’s Institute of Education Sciences. He serves on a number of national advisory groups related to prevention science and community based research. His intervention programs are being implemented at sites throughout the United States and Europe. He is the recipient of the 2012 Society for Prevention Research Translational Science Award.

Presentation 2 – Risk, Resilience, and Recovery for Rhesus Monkeys Experiencing Early Adversity
Panelist 2 - Stephen J. Suomi, Chief, Laboratory of Comparative Ethology, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, Maryland

Biography. Stephen J. Suomi is chief of the Laboratory of Comparative Ethology at the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development in Bethesda, Maryland. He studied Psychology at the undergraduate level at Stanford University where he received a B.A. in psychology in 1968, then continued his studies at the University of Wisconsin, receiving his Ph.D. in 1971. He began his professional career in the University of Wisconsin's Psychology Department, where he attained full professorship in 1984. In 1983, he began his work at the NICHD. Dr. Suomi has received international recognition for his extensive research on biobehavioral development in rhesus monkeys and other nonhuman primate species. His initial postdoctoral research (with his mentor, Harry F. Harlow) successfully reversed the adverse behavior effects of early social isolation, previously thought to be permanent, in this species. His subsequent research at the University of Wisconsin led to his election as a Fellow in the American Association for the Advancement of Science "for major contributions to the understanding of social factors that influence the psychological development of nonhuman primates." Since joining the NICHD, he has described interactions between genetic and environmental factors that shape individual biobehavioral development, characterized both behavioral and physiological features of distinctive rhesus monkey phenotypes, and demonstrated the adaptive significance of these different phenotypes in naturalistic settings.

 

Invited Roundtable

New IRB Policies and the Ethical Conduct of Child and Adolescent Research: What You Need to Know Now!

Moderator: Celia B. Fisher, Marie Ward Doty University Chair, Professor of Psychology and Director, Fordham University Center for Ethics Education
Friday, April 19, 10:20 AM - 11:50 AM; Room 4C-2 (Washington Convention Center)

Panelists:

  1. Donald  J. Brunnquell, Office of Ethics for Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota
  2. Diane L. Hughes, New York University
  3. Lynn S.  Liben, The Pennsylvania State University
  4. Valerie  Maholmes, NIH/NICHD
  5. Stuart Plattner, National Science Foundation
  6. Stephen T. Russell, University of Arizona
  7. Elizabeth J. Susman, The Pennsylvania State University

Abstract. For the first time in 20 years HHS is considering changes to the Common Rule regulating IRB evaluation of research. These rule changes will have a significant impact on how IRBs evaluate and approve developmental and pediatric research protocols in critical areas including: Expedited review, designation of research as minimal risk, waivers of parental permission, the content and format of consent forms and the use and storage of longitudinal and archival data, including bio-specimens. Given the importance of any rule change to the conduct of science related to infants, children, and adolescents, SRCD convened a task force to draw up a response to HHS with recommendations for how best to incorporate these considerations in the final regulatory changes. Drawing on the task force deliberations, this roundtable will stimulate discussion to assist members in preparing for the proposed rule changes and successfully navigating the evolving IRB approval process.

Moderator Biography. Celia B. Fisher, Ph.D., Marie Ward Doty University Chair, Professor of Psychology and Director, Fordham University Center for Ethics Education received the 2010 HII Lifetime Achievement Award for Excellence in Human Research Protection. She has chaired federal advisory panels for the Environmental Protection Agency and Department of Health and Human Services and the APA Ethics Code Task Force; served on the NIMH Data Safety and Monitoring Board, the IOM Committee on Clinical Research Involving Children; and sits on the NIH Research Study Section on Societal and Ethical Issues. A founding editor of Applied Developmental Science, her publications and federally funded research programs focus on ethical issues and wellbeing of vulnerable populations including ethnic minority youth and families, active drug users, medically ill youth, college students at risk for drinking problems, and adults with impaired consent capacity. She directs the NIDA funded Fordham University HIV Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute.

Panelist 1 Biography. Donald Brunnquell, Ph.D., MA, LP, is Director of the Office of Ethics for Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota and has been a member and chair of Children's Hospitals & Clinics of Minnesota IRB. His work includes consultation, education and policy regarding clinical and organizational ethics in the pediatric health care. As the recipient of a Bush Foundation Leadership Fellows Grant in 1991 he completed a master’s degree in philosophy, concentrating in ethics. Since that time his work has focused on pediatric medical and mental health ethics. His interests include end of life decision-making for children, definition of children’s and parents’ interests and rights, and medical futility. He.  He is a licensed psychologist with a special interest in pediatric psychology and ethics, instructor for the Institute of Child Development and Clinical Assistant Professor in Clinical Psychology at the University of Minnesota, and affiliate faculty University of Minnesota Center for Bioethics.

Panelist 2 Biography. Diane L. Hughes is Professor of Applied Psychology in the Steinhardt School of Culture, Development, and Education at NYU, co-director of NYU’s Center for Research on Culture, Development, and Education and co-chair of the cross-university Study Group on Race, Culture, and Ethnicity, former chair of the MacArthur Midlife Network’s study of Ethnic Diversity and Urban Contexts, affiliate of the John D. and Catherine T. McArthur Network on Success in Midlife, and member of the Carnegie Corporations Consortium on Intergroup Relations among Youth.  Her publications and research, supported by the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and the William T. Grant Foundation, NIH, NSF and NICHD focus on the nature and consequences of parents’ teachings about race, parents’ and adolescents’ discrimination experiences within workplaces, schools and peer groups, influences on youths’ academic achievement, strategies for identifying cultural knowledge and for conducting culturally anchored research.

Panelist 3 Biography. Lynn S. Liben is Distinguished Professor of Psychology, Human Development, and Education at Penn State. She studies first, gender development and the effects of gender stereotypes on educational and occupational outcomes; and second, spatial development, including the roles of education (formal and informal) and parenting and their consequences for STEM outcomes. Current research addresses links between spatial skills and map-use and science learning; the gender gap on the National Geographic Bee; and effects of a spatial-skills curriculum on middle-school students’ STEM achievements and interests. Dr. Liben is currently President-Elect of the Society for Research in Child Development, former President of the Piaget Society and of APA’s Division 7 (Developmental). She is past Editor of Child Development and the Journal of Experimental Child Psychology and a Fellow of APA, APS, EPA, and AERA; her research has been funded by NSF, NICHD, NIE, and the National Geographic Society.

Panelist 4 Biography. Valerie Maholmes, Ph.D., is Program Director for the Child and Family Processes/ Maltreatment and Violence Research Program, Child Development and Behavior Branch at the NICHD Eunice Kennedy Shriver and Co-chair of the NIH Child Abuse and Neglect Working Group, 2003 recipient of the SRCD and AAAS Executive Branch Science Policy Fellowship, and Yale Child Study Center Irving B. Harris Assistant Professor of Child Psychiatry and director of research and policy for the School Development. At NICHD she provides leadership on research and research training on theory-driven prevention and intervention approaches to psychosocial and psychobiological antecedents and consequences of child abuse and neglect and exposure to violence; normative development; physical and social environmental effects on health and psychological development; public health, justice, social services, antisocial behavior, conduct problems and aggression. Recently, she initiated funding opportunities for research examining long-term consequences of military deployment and reintegration on child and family functioning.

Panelist 5 Biography. Stuart Plattner received his Ph.D. in Cultural Anthropology from Stanford University in 1969. His dissertation research was on the economic anthropology of long distance itinerant peddling in Chiapas, Mexico. After post-doctoral training in Economics and research in Guatemala he taught at the University of Missouri-St. Louis from 1971-1985. Stuart Plattner helped found and served as president of the Society for Economic Anthropology as well as the Society for Anthropology Sciences. From 1985 until retirement in 2005 he worked as the Program Director for Cultural Anthropology at the National Science Foundation. From 1994 onwards he served as the Human Subjects Research Officer for the NSF, during which time he lead the development of guidance and procedures for NSF's application of the Common Rule, and served on the interagency Human Subjects Research Subcommittee. In retirement he devotes himself to fine woodworking.

Panelist 6 Biography. Stephen T. Russell is Interim Director of the John and Doris Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona. He is also Distinguished Professor and Fitch Nesbitt Endowed Chair in Family and Consumer Sciences, and Director of the Frances McClelland Institute for Children, Youth, and Families. Stephen conducts research on adolescent pregnancy and parenting, cultural influences on parent-adolescent relationships, and the health and development of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth. He is President of the Society for Research on Adolescence.

Panelist 7 Biography. Elizabeth J. Susman is the Jean Phillips Shibley Professor of Biobehavioral Health in the Department of Biobehavioral Health at The Pennsylvania State University. Her research program combines behavioral endocrinology, developmental psychology and neuroscience and focuses specifically on the neuroendocrinology of puberty, stress and health in youth. The research is published in developmental and biomedical journals. Dr. Susman is a member of Governing Council of SRCD.

Special Symposium

How (Not) to Work with Private Foundations in Child Development Research

Chair: Simon Sommer, M.A., Head of Research Funding, Jacobs Foundation
Saturday, April 20, 10:20 AM - 11:50 AM; Room 4C-3 (Washington Convention Center)

Integrative Statement. In this symposium current and former senior staff and leadership from foundations engaged on the area of research on child and youth development will share and discuss experiences they have made with applicants, grantees, and reviewers. In turn, researchers, applicants and grantees are asked to report to the panel about their experiences with and expectations towards private funders so that both sides can benefit from the event. Key topics to be addressed include: Differences between working with private and with public funders; successful examples and guidelines how to be successful at private sources (“Best Practices”); pitfalls to be avoided when working with private funders (“Worst Practices”).

Biography. Since 2006, Simon Sommer has been responsible for the area of Research Funding at the Jacobs Foundation, Switzerland. His responsibilities include research funding, intervention research, the annual Jacobs Foundation Conferences, and workshops and symposia at Marbach Castle. In addition, he coordinates the Foundation’s cooperation with research funding agencies and organizations as well as with professional and scholarly societies in the area of child- and youth development. Before joining the Jacobs Foundation, he worked for the Volkswagen Foundation in Hannover and for McKinsey & Company in Berlin, Germany. Simon Sommer holds graduate degrees in Cultural Studies (Universität Lüneburg, Germany) and Musicology (University of Maryland, College Park, USA) and has published on issues of higher education policy and research funding.

Presentation 1 - Two different worlds? Experiences from private and public research funding in child and youth development
Anne C. Petersen, Research Professor, University of Michigan; Founder & President, Global Philanthropy Alliance; former Senior Vice President for Programs W.K. Kellogg Foundation, and former Deputy Director and Chief Operating Officer National Science Foundation

Presentation 2 - Dos and Don’ts: Tips for applying for a Grant grant
Vivian Tseng, Vice President, Program, William T. Grant Foundation

Presentation 3 - Six things not to do working with a private research funder
Simon Sommer, Head Research Funding, Jacobs Foundation

Presentation 4 - Changing sides – experiences from grant giving and grant seeking
Lonnie Sherrod, Executive Director SRCD, and former Executive Vice President, William T. Grant Foundation

Presentation 5 - A newcomer’s perspective on researcher-foundation relationships that move the field and shape policy
Deborah A. Phillips, President, Foundation for Child Development

Memorial Symposium

Honoring the Legacy of Nicki R. Crick

Chair: Kenneth A. Dodge, Duke University
Thursday, April 18, 4:10 PM - 5:40 PM; Room 4C-3 (Washington Convention Center)

Biography. Nicki R. Crick passed away peacefully on October 28, 2012 at the age of 54 after a brief but courageous battle with cancer. Crick was a Distinguished McKnight University Professor and Irving B. Harris Professor of Child Psychology at the Institute of Child Development, University of Minnesota.

Nicki obtained a bachelor’s degree in psychology and a master’s degree in human development and family studies at Purdue University. In 1992, she earned her doctorate in clinical psychology from Vanderbilt University. Nicki spent five years as an assistant professor in human development and family studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign before joining the faculty at the University of Minnesota in 1996. Nicki was a William T. Grant Faculty Scholar and was the Director of the Institute of Child Development from January 2005 to June 2011.

Nicki Crick is internationally known for her innovative research on relational forms of aggression. Relational aggression, defined as behaviors that harm others via damage to relationships, includes acts such as using social exclusion or spreading malicious rumors. Girls are more likely to engage in relational than physical forms of aggression. Crick’s research documented the harmful consequences of relational aggression for victims and perpetrators, and as a result aggression researchers have expanded their studies to include a more gender-balanced examination of the causes and consequences of aggressive conduct.

The scope of Nicki Crick’s work is far-reaching. She authored over 90 research articles and chapters. Several of her papers (e.g., 1995 publication on relational aggression; 1994 review of the social information processing patterns in aggressive youth) are among the most influential papers in the field of developmental science. Nicki Crick received numerous awards for her scientific contributions, including the Distinguished Scientific Award for Early Career Contributions to Psychology from the American Psychological Association and the Boyd McCandless Young Scientist Award from Division 7 (Developmental Psychology) of the American Psychological Association.

(Dianna Murray-Close, 2012)

Presentation 1 - Multilevel Perspectives on Potential Precursors to Borderline Personality in Maltreated Children
Dante Cicchetti and Kathryn Hecht, Institute of Child Development, University of Minnesota, Fred A. Rogosch, Mt. Hope Family Center, University of Rochester

Presentation 2 - Psychophysiological Processes in the Development of Relational Aggression
Dianna (Annie) K. Murray-Close, University of Vermont

Presentation 3 - Socio-Cultural Perspectives on the Bully/Victim Phenomenon
David Schwartz, University of Southern California, Jamie M. Ostrov, University at Buffalo

Presentation 4 - Peer Relationships and Psychopathology in War-Affected Ugandan Youth
Katherine Hecht, Peter Ralston, Nicki R. Crick, Dante Cicchetti, University of Minnesota