International Day: Thursday March 21, 2019

Browse the Biennial Meeting Invited Program:

9:30 am - 11:00 am   CONCURRENT SESSIONS

Topic: Early Language

Location: TBA

Natalia Arias-Trejo, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México

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Title: "It’s more complicated than that:" Child Development Across the Life-course in High Adversity Settings

Location: TBA

Mark Tomlinson is the co-Director of the Institute of Child and Adolescent Health Research at Sellenbosch University. His scholarly work has involved a diverse range of topics that have in common an interest in factors that contribute to compromised maternal health, to understanding infant and child development in contexts of high adversity, to understand the impact of maternal depression on infant and child health and development, and how to develop community based home visiting intervention programmes. He was elected as a member of the Academy of Science in South Africa in 2017. He has published over 200 papers in peer-reviewed journals, edited two books and published numerous chapters. He is the lead editor of Child and Adolescent Development: An Expanded Focus for Public Health in Africa from University of Cape Town Press. He is on the Editorial Board of PLoS Medicine; is an Associate Editor of Infant Mental Health Journal, and is also on the Editorial Board of Psychology, Health and Medicine.

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11:15 am - 12:15 pm   TAD TALKS ON INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH (CONSECUTIVE)

Title: Mother and Infant Brains Interact

Location: TBA

Gianluca Esposito is a Developmental Neuroscientist qualified to advance the ongoing investigations on child psychopathology contributing strengths in human electrophysiology and neuroimaging, complex data modeling, and comparative physiological assessment with the aim of studying Early Social Interaction. He focuses on comparative neuro-behavioral analysis of mother-infant interaction across mammalian species, and its implication to psychopathology. His work has produced publications, collaborations and has been recognized several times by a number of agencies from Europe, Singapore, Japan, USA and UAE. His studies have been published in different fields (Psychology, Biology, Neuroscience, Education), using multiple technologies (e.g. fNIRS; EEG, fMRI, ECG, Animal models; genetic assessments; pharmacological manipulations). Twitter: @gesposito79

Abstract: Attachment between mother and infant is the earliest and most critical social relationship in mammalians. Specific automatic brain patterns regulate infants seeking proximity to mother and prompt protest on separation from mother. These mechanisms promote attachment through vocal communication and bodily movement. Reciprocally, enhanced brain activity in mothers is associated with mothers’ movement and speech to infants and, more generally, with their propensity to caregive. Infant and maternal brains “respond” to one another, and they follow a dynamic synchronous “dance”. During this TAD, I will illustrate these mother-infant dynamics with new findings from animal and human studies that employ a variety of techniques from genetic engineering to neuroimaging hyper-scanning.

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Topic: The development and acculturation in contexts of immigration and migration

Location: TBA

Peter Titzmann, Leibniz University, Germany

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Topic: International perspectives on health and development

Location: TBA

Carol M. Worthman, Emory University

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12:30 pm - 2:00 pm    CONCURRENT SESSIONS

Title: Enhancing the Lives of Global Youth: Plasticity, Non-Ergodicity, Specificity, and the Promotion of Social Justice

Location: TBA

Richard M. Lerner is the Bergstrom Chair in Applied Developmental Science and the Director of the Institute for Applied Research in Youth Development at Tufts University. He went from kindergarten through Ph.D. within the New York City public schools, completing his doctorate at the City University of New York in 1971 in developmental psychology. Lerner has more than 700 scholarly publications, including more than 80 authored or edited books. He was the founding editor of the Journal of Research on Adolescence and of Applied Developmental Science, which he continues to edit. Lerner is known for his theory of relations between life-span human development and social change, and for his research about the relations between adolescents and their peers, families, schools, and communities. His work integrates the study of public policies and community-based programs with the promotion of positive youth development and youth contributions to civil society.

Abstract: Within contemporary developmental science, description, explanation, and optimization goals are increasingly pursued within models framed by relational developmental systems (RDS) metatheory, which emphasizes that relative plasticity – systematic changes in mutually influential relations between a specific individual and his/her specific context – characterizes life-span development. The non-ergodicity and idiography of these dynamic, individual-context relations mean that specificity should be the starting point of efforts to optimize each human life or to promote equity, opportunity, and social justice among diverse youth. To illustrate how RDS-based models can capitalize on the plasticity, non-ergodicity, and specificity to enhance youth thriving, I discuss findings from the Compassion International Study of Positive Youth Development, a multi-nation longitudinal investigation of thriving among majority-world youth. I note directions for future RDS-based research aimed at promoting health, thriving, and social justice among diverse youth, and I emphasize the timeliness and potential impacts of a focus on global youth.

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Topic: Impacts of the climate crisis on children and youth: Roles for developmental science

Location: TBA

Ann Sanson is a developmental psychologist whose research has principally focused on understanding the role of child, family and community characteristics in social and emotional development from infancy to adulthood. She is a principal investigator on two major Australian longitudinal studies – the 3-generation Australian Temperament Project and the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children. Her engagement with psychology’s contributions to social issues includes roles with the Australian Psychological Society, the Australian Research Alliance for Children and Youth, and the international Committee for the Psychological Study of Peace. Her current work focuses on the impact of the climate crisis on current and future generations of children. She is an Honorary Professorial Fellow at the University of Melbourne, and a Fellow of the Australian Psychological Society and the International Society for the Study of Behavioral Development. She has over 200 publications.

Abstract: The increase in extreme weather events across the world is a harbinger of much worse climate impacts in the near future. As a disruptor of the basic necessities for health and well-being, global warming poses an existential threat to current and future generations of children and youth. Urgent action is needed to avoid catastrophic impacts.

This talk considers the many ways in which we, as developmental science researchers, practitioners and advocates, can use our knowledge, skills and resources to help protect future generations. We can help them develop a sense of agency and resilience to cope with the climate threat, engage effectively in climate mitigation and adaptation, and develop skills and attributes to live in a climate-changed and low-carbon world. And as informed advocates for the younger generation, we can work for urgent transformational change at national and global levels.

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2:15 pm - 3:45 pm  CONCURRENT SESSIONS

Topic:The lives of children growing up in poverty in diverse cultural contexts

Location: TBA

Jo Boyden, University of Oxford

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Title: Continuous Time Dynamic Modeling

Location: TBA

Manuel C. Völkle is professor for psychological research methods at the Humboldt University Berlin and an adjunct researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development in Berlin, Germany. His research revolves around the development and application of new methods for the study of developmental dynamics in affective and cognitive functioning. Much of his recent work is concerned with continuous time modeling and the analysis of the intricate relationship of between- and within-person differences in psychological constructs as they evolve over time.

Abstract: The goal of this presentation is to introduce participants to continuous time dynamic modeling. Continuous time dynamic models are models for the analysis of change that make optimal use of the time structure to infer the development and dynamic relationships among constructs of interest. After distinguishing between static and dynamic models for the analysis of change and a short discussion of their respective advantages and disadvantages, I will introduce the basics of continuous time dynamic modeling in a stepwise fashion. I will highlight the possibility to work with intensive longitudinal data, including the analysis of N = 1 time-series (e.g., dynamic factor models), as well as panel data (T small, N large). Apart from a general introduction, special emphasis will be put on the interpretation and practical implementation of these models. I will end with an overview of recent developments, current limitations, and future research directions.

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4:00 pm - 5:30 pm   CONCURRENT SESSIONS

Topic: Measuring Early Learning Quality and Outcomes project

Location: TBA

Abbie Raikes, University of Nebraska Medical Center

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Title: Infant Regulatory Problems and Developmental Trajectories into Adulthood

Location: TBA

Dieter F. Wolke is Professor of Developmental Psychology and Individual Differences at the University of Warwick. Dieter studied at the University of Kiel, Germany and obtained his Ph.D. from the University of London. He has worked at different colleges of the University of London, the Universities of Munich, Hertfordshire, Bristol and the research funding sector (Zurich) before joining the University of Warwick, UK in 2006.  His research is interdisciplinary, longitudinal and in the field of Developmental Psychopathology. His major research topics are: 1. early regulatory problems (crying, sleeping and feeding) in infancy and their long term consequences; 2. how preterm birth affects brain development and psychological development and quality of life; and 3. Peer or sibling victimization (bullying): precursors, consequences and interventions. He is joint manager of the Horizon 2020 RECAP-Preterm project involving 12 countries trying to improve the lives of preterm children. He received an honorary doctorate (Dr rer nat h.c.) from the Ruhr University Bochum, Germany, in 2014 for his contribution to Psychological Science.

Abstract: All babies cry and they have to learn to console themselves, to learn to sleep through the night and overcome neophobia to accept solid food in infancy.  This is often described as bio-behavioural adaptation. However, if the attempts at adaptation fail and continue beyond a normative period (e.g. excessive crying continues beyond the 3 months colic period), this indicates early regulatory problems, i.e. the inability to stop an ongoing behavior such as crying or waking at night. Around 10% of infants experience more than one regulatory problem at the same time, i.e. multiple regulatory problems (MRP). Although highly challenging for parents, MRP often occur despite sensitive parenting. New evidence will be presented that MRP increases the risk of dysregulation across childhood and has cascading effects on mental health in childhood, adolescence and even adulthood. These findings have implications for research on childhood self-regulation and clinical implications for treatment.

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