Relevant Day: Saturday March 23, 2019

Browse the Biennial Meeting Invited Program:

8:00 am - 9:30 am   CONCURRENT SESSIONS

Title: What Can Cognitive Science Say to Teachers?

Location: Baltimore Convention Center, Room 307

Kelly S. Mix's research focuses on the development of number concepts and mathematical reasoning, with a particular interest in the use of cognitive science principles to improve children's learning.  She earned her Ph.D. at the University of Chicago in 1995 and held faculty positions in the Department of Psychology at Indiana University and the College of Education at Michigan State University prior to joining the faculty at the University of Maryland in 2016.  She has published over 50 journal articles, books, and book chapters, and she has received research funding from the Institute of Education Sciences, the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, and the Spencer Foundation.  She received the Boyd McCandless Award (APA Division 7) in 2002.

Abstract: This talk will describe two programs of research based on the idea that children’s learning of mathematics in school can be enhanced by applying findings from cognitive science.  One program of research focuses on the relation between spatial skill and mathematics, and asks whether teachers can leverage this connection instructionally.  The second program of research focuses on children’s understanding of place value, and asks whether mathematics learning can be improved by engaging basic cognitive processes such as categorization, labeling, and structure mapping.  The talk will emphasize not only the potential benefits of cognitive science research for educational practice, but also ways that research may be shaped and improved through close collaboration with teachers.

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8:00 am - 9:30 am   Collaborative Science in the Spirit of 2044: Diversity is Key

Location: Baltimore Convention Center, Room 309

Because developmental phenomena are complex, most investigative teams in developmental science include individuals from multiple disciplines and perspectives. Yet, collaborations can be challenging. Given that the U.S. will become a “majority-minority” country with no clear racial-ethnic group being a numerical majority by 2044; it is critical that developmental scientists attend to cultural and contextual diversity in their research. Further, given globalization and immigration and migration patterns, we must include international perspectives in our conversations about diversity.

Hosted by the Ethnic and Racial Issues and Equity and Justice Committees along with the Asian, Black, and Latino Caucuses, this invited salon serves as a companion to the preconference, Conceptualizing and measuring culture, context, race, and ethnicity: A focus on science, ethics, and collaboration in the Spirit of 2044. The invited salon highlights successful diverse, collaborative research teams that have: (1) identified processes unique to diverse populations and (2) executed their research projects with great attention to the ethics of doing the work with underserved and/or underrepresented populations.

Panelists Margaret Caughy, Suzanne Randolph Cunningham, Diane Hughes, and Catherine Tamis-Lemonda will share how they have successfully collaborated on research teams to advance developmental science in the Spirit of 2044. Specifically, they will address challenges and strategies to overcome them, grantsmanship, building interdisciplinary teams, and ethics as well as provide recommendations on ways that SRCD can support collaborative science with diverse teams. This interaction among panelists and attendees will offer practical strategies for building research teams prepared to carefully consider diversity in its’ many forms.

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Panelist

Diane Hughes is professor of Applied Psychology in the Steinhardt School of Culture, Development, and Education and co-director with Catherine Tamis LeMonda and Niobe Way of the Center for Research on Culture, Development, and Education. Her research interests focus on (a) understanding how racial/ethnic dynamics influence individual's experiences across multiple settings including workplaces, classrooms, neighborhoods, and families, and (b) ethnic and cultural differences in parents' socialization goals, beliefs, and practices, especially as these influence children's learning. Dr. Hughes conducts school and community based studies with adolescents and their parents using multiple methods (interviews, surveys, focus groups). In her most recent work. Dr. Hughes, Dr. Niobe Way, and their students followed two multi-ethnic cohorts of NYC early adolescents (and their mothers) from the time they entered middle school through their junior year of high school to understand how varied stressors and supports influenced academic and socio-emotional development over time. Hughes received her B.A. in Psychology and African American Studies from Williams College and her Ph.D. in Community and Developmental Psychology from the University of Michigan. She is former chair of the John d. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation's sub-group on Diversity in Mid-Life and co-chair of the 14 member cross-university Study Group on Race, Culture, and ethnicity. Her research has been supported by the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the William T. Grant Foundation, the National Science Foundation, and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

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Panelist

Margaret Caughy’s research combines the unique perspectives of developmental science, epidemiology, and public health in studying the contexts of risk and resilience affecting young children. She is particularly interested in race/ethnic disparities in health and development and how these disparities can be understood within the unique ecological niches of ethnic minority families. Dr. Caughy has been the principal investigator of several studies focused on how inequities in family and community processes affect the cognitive development, socioemotional functioning, and early academic achievement of young children in diverse race/ethnic groups. Another theme of her research has been methodological, specifically methods related to measuring neighborhood context and the utilization of these measures in models explaining child developmental competence using multilevel and structural equations modeling methods. Twitter: @DrMOCaughy

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Panelist

Suzanne M. Randolph Cunningham PhD is Associate Professor Emerita in the department of family science at University of Maryland, College Park, School of Public Health.  Upon retirement from academia, she joined The MayaTech Corporation, an applied public health research firm in Silver Spring, Maryland (USA) as Chief Science Officer.  She received her bachelor's degree in psychology from Howard University in Washington, DC (USA) and her masters and PhD degrees in psychology (developmental) from University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.  She has chaired the SRCD's black caucus and is recipient of the American Psychological Association Minority Fellowship Program's James Jones Lifetime Achievement Award and the Association of Black Psychologists, Inc.'s Distinguished Psychologist Award.  She hails from New Orleans, Louisiana; is married; and in her spare time is a visual artist. Twitter: @SRandolphMTC

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Panelist

Catherine S. Tamis-LeMonda is Professor of Developmental Psychology at Steinhardt, New York University, where she co-directs the Center for Research on Culture, Development, and Education. She is a Fellow of the American Psychological Society; member of the governing council of the Society for Research on Child Development; and President-elect of the International Congress of Infant Studies. Tamis-LeMonda’s research focuses on infant language, communication, object play, and motor skill, and the ways that parenting and cultural contexts shape children’s experiences and learning. Her research aims to illuminate universal and culture-specific developmental processes, developmental cascades, and early building blocks to school readiness in children from different ethnic and socio-demographic backgrounds in the United States and globally. Tamis-LeMonda’s research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institute of Mental Health, Administration for Children, Youth and Families, Ford Foundation, Lego Foundation and the Robinhood Foundation.

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Moderator

Gabriela Livas Stein is a licensed psychologist and Associate Professor of Clinical Psychology in the Department of Psychology at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG). Dr. Stein’s research focuses on Latinx youth and families with
particular attention to cultural processes and experiences such as cultural values, racialethnic discrimination, and racial-ethnic socialization. Her work is informed by developmental psychopathology and cultural-ecological frameworks. Dr. Stein is the Vice President of Programming for the Society for Research on Adolescence and an Associate Editor for Journal of Research on Adolescence. Dr. Stein is also the past president of SRCD’s Latino Caucus. In 2017, Dr. Stein was recognized as a Minority Access National Role Model; she received this honor for her “exemplary achievements in fields underrepresented by minorities and in advancing underrepresented population groups.” Since 2017, Dr. Stein has been an active member of the ERI committee.Twitter: @livas_stein

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Moderator

Dawn P. Witherspoon is the McCourtney Family Early Career Professor in Psychology and Associate Director of PACT, a community-university partnership, at Pennsylvania State University. Her research focuses on the ways in which families and youth are shaped by the contexts in which they are embedded, particularly focusing on how neighborhood, family, and cultural factors affect adolescents’ academic, psycho-social, and behavioral well-being. The crux of her research focuses on the neighborhood context and its relation to other proximal contexts for adolescents and identifies positive characteristics in multiple contexts that are related to adolescent well-being. Dr. Witherspoon is on the editorial board of Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology and Developmental Psychology, where she is co-editing a special issue, “Hidden Populations: Uncovering the Developmental Experiences of Communities of Color across Contexts”. Witherspoon has been a member of SRCD’s Ethnic and Racial Issues committee since 2011 and is now the chairperson.

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9:45 am - 11:15 am   CONCURRENT SESSIONS

Title: Modern Modeling: Guidelines for Best Practice and Useful Innovations

Location: Baltimore Convention Center, Room 310

Todd D. Little Ph.D., is a Professor and Director of the Institute for Measurement, Methodology, Analysis and Policy at Texas Tech University. Little is widely recognized for his quantitative work on various aspects of applied SEM (e.g., modern missing data treatments, indicator selection, parceling, modeling developmental processes) as well as his substantive developmental research (e.g., action-control processes and motivation, coping, and self-regulation). In 2001, Little was elected to membership in the Society for Multivariate Experimental Psychology, and in 2009, he was elected President of APA’s Division 5 (Evaluation, Measurement, and Statistics). He founded the internationally renowned ‘Stats Camps’. He is a fellow in APA, APS, and AAAS. He has received numerous awards including the Cohen award from Division 5 of APA for distinguished contributions to teaching and mentoring and the inaugural Distinguished Contributions Award for Mentoring Developmental Scientists from the Society for Research in Child Development.

Abstract: Best practices in the field of developmental methods are themselves developing. I will review a number of important features of modern modeling in developmental research from design-related features, to measurement-related features as well as analytic approaches. I will focus on latent variable modeling in general covering related topics such as parceling, missing data treatments, and model testing.

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Title: Fifteen Years of Research on the Role of Race in Adolescent Academic and Social Life Online

Location: Baltimore Convention Center, Room 307

Brendesha Tynes is an associate professor of education and psychology at the University of Southern California Rossier School of Education. Her research for the past 18 years has focused on the racial landscape adolescents navigate in online settings, online racial discrimination and the design of digital tools that empower youth of color. Tynes is the recipient of numerous awards including a Ford Pre-doctoral and Postdoctoral Fellowships, the American Educational Research Association’s 2012 Early Career Contribution Award for scholars who have made significant scholarly contributions to communities of color, the 2015 AERA Early Career Award, and the Spencer Foundation Midcareer Award.  She was also an honoree in the APA’s Thank-a-Scientist Campaign for 2017, and her article in the Journal of Adolescent Research was #1 (or the top 10) in the 50 most frequently read articles for several years. Her work has been cited in the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, Newsweek and several other outlets. Twitter: @brendesha

Abstract: Drawing on developmental theories of race, this presentation will synthesize more than a decade of research on the messages adolescents send and receive about race online. From articles on the contributions of one’s racial-ethnic group to viral videos of police killings, engagement with race-related materials and discussions online can shape developmental outcomes. Datasets to be discussed include a range of transcripts and profiles from AOL Chat, Facebook, MySpace, & Twitter. Findings from the NIH-funded Teen Life Online and in Schools Project, a longitudinal study of online racial discrimination, will also be highlighted. Finally, pilot data from the first nationally representative study of critical media literacy will be presented along with preliminary analyses of adolescents’ ability to evaluate fake race-related profiles and bots such as those used to infiltrate the 2016 election.

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11:30 am - 12:30 pm: TAD TALKS ON USING RESEARCH TO IMPROVE THE LIVES OF CHILDREN AROUND THE WORLD (CONSECUTIVE)

Location: Baltimore Hilton, Level 2, Holiday Ballroom
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Title: Character Strengths as the Next Frontier of Human Development

Andrew Serazin, D.Phil., is president of the Templeton World Charity Foundation. As a researcher, entrepreneur, and executive, Dr. Serazin has worked to develop creative, multidisciplinary solutions for some of the world’s most pressing challenges.
Most recently, he was Founder and CEO of Matatu, a venture-backed biotechnology company that harnesses beneficial bacteria for the future of animal health. From 2006 to 2012, Dr. Serazin served as Lead for Human Biology and Nutrition in Global Health Discovery & Translational Science department at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. He founded and led Grand Challenges Explorations, an early-stage, innovative medical research fund that has attracted ideas from 60,000 scientists in over 100 countries and has resulted in over 1,000 projects. Dr. Serazin has also worked as an advisor to Mars, Inc. on its global efforts in nutrition, food safety, and sustainable agriculture.
Dr. Serazin was Departmental Lecturer in the Zoology Department at University of Oxford, where he conducted infectious disease research and taught courses on the biology of disease. After receiving a B.S. from the University of Notre Dame, he was a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford, where he received his doctorate. His original research has appeared in such journals as Science, PLoS Medicine, Nature Immunology, and Lancet.

Abstract: Despite major gains in health and economic indicators, measures of social relationships are a growing cause for concern. Nearly half of all US adults experience loneliness on a routine basis and suicide is now the leading cause of death among youth worldwide. Templeton World Charity Foundation has the launched the Global Innovations for Character Development (GICD) initiative with the aim of making substantial progress on the habits and relationships that enable individual and communal prosperity. To this end, the foundation will fund up to 30 scientifically tested interventions to improve one or more character strengths in low and middle income countries. This presentation will highlight several exciting programs such as the Friendship Bench and Forgiveness Therapy as potential models for making progress. The second round of the GICD initiative will be March 23 to August 26, 2019 and all researchers from low and middle income countries are encouraged to apply.

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Title: Using Research to Uphold the Universal Aspiration of Parenting: The Best Start for Every Child

Pia Rebello Britto, Ph.D., Global Chief and Senior Advisor, Early Childhood Development, UNICEF, is internationally renowned for her expertise in early childhood policy and programmes. 

Dr. Britto obtained her doctoral degree in developmental psychology from Columbia University and prior to joining UNICEF she was an Assistant Professor at Yale University’s Child Study Center. 

Dr. Britto is known globally for her expertise in early childhood programmes, policies and advocacy. She has worked extensively with partners to advance the ECD agenda globally, and nationally, to give every child a best start to life. The focus of her work has been on strengthening multi-sectoral programmes for young children and families, measuring of results, mobilizing political commitment, creating a global architecture for ECD and setting technical standards of excellence.

Dr. Britto is the recipient of several national and international awards in recognition for her work and has published numerous books, articles, chapters and reports.

Twitter: @piabritto

Abstract: One of the most universal aspirations, the world over, is that all parents want the best for their child. One of the irrefutable facts, the world over, is that parenting is one of the most significant influences on early child development with life long impacts. If we are to improve the lives of the 43% of children under the age of 5 years in low and middle-income countries who are not achieving their developmental potential we need to make culturally responsive universal supports for parenting a reality. The TAD talk will issue a call to action for research to achieve this aim with 3 types of evidence – research that is a powerful tool for advocacy; research that informs the development of effective parenting support programmes; and research that tells the story of success in numbers.  Together, by supporting parents, we can aim to give every child the best start to life.

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Title: Outsized Impact: The Power of Science to Change Policy and Practice for Crisis-Affected Children

Sarah Smith, Ed.D. is the Senior Director of Education at the International Rescue Committee (IRC). She and her team establish the vision and direction for the IRC’s Education programs around the world.  Dr. Smith has over twenty years of experience managing and advising programs for children and youth in conflict and post-conflict countries in Africa, Asia and the Middle East. Before joining the IRC, Dr. Smith worked for Concern Worldwide, UNHCR and as a Peace Corps volunteer. She began her career teaching preschool and elementary school. Dr. Smith earned a Master’s degree in Education from Harvard University Graduate School of Education and a Doctorate in Education from Teachers College, Columbia University. Twitter: @SarKathSmith

Abstract: Around world, 68.5 million people are displaced as a result of conflict and crisis. This is more than at any time in history. Children--who comprise more than half of all refugees-- are often the most vulnerable in contexts of conflict and displacement. Dr. Sarah Smith, head of education at the International Rescue Committee, will outline the key challenges facing children in crisis contexts, citing IRC’s work and research in 40 countries around the world. Dr Smith will highlight the critical role the academic community can play in changing the trajectory of these children’s lives, and the changes that must take place for this community to have an outsized impact.

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12:45 pm - 2:15 pm   SESSION

Title: Lighting Candles in Dark Rooms: Hidden Issues in Research on Primary Education (PreK - Grade 5)

Location: Baltimore Convention Center, Room 307

Ruby Takanishi is senior research fellow in the Early and Elementary Education Policy division at New America in Washington, DC.  Takanishi was the president and CEO of the Foundation for Child Development, and executive director of the Carnegie Council on Adolescent Development of Carnegie Corporation of New York.

She chaired the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine consensus committee on the education of dual-language learners from birth to age 21.

Takanishi has received awards from the American Psychological Association, American Sociological Association (Division of Children and Families), and SRCD in recognition of her contributions to connecting research with public policies.  The American Education Research Association honored her with its Distinguished Public Service Award.

Takanishi received her BA and PhD from Stanford University, and taught at UCLA, Teachers College-Columbia University, Bank Street College of Education, and Yale University.

Abstract: Determining the short- and long-term effects of early education (Head Start, PreK) on children at risk for low educational outcomes has been a central concern of researchers and policymakers for over 50 years.  When positive outcomes are found to be lasting, the influences of children’s experiences in early education and in the following primary grades (K-5) are not well understood.  Hypotheses about how some early education efforts yield lasting effects while others do not, will be identified, including evidence-informed conceptions of children as learners and how those conceptions affect classroom learning opportunities and alignment of instruction. The demographic diversity of young children, specifically racial, ethnic, cultural, and linguistic, present challenges to current approaches to studying the influences of early education and how primary school learning opportunities are designed.

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2:30 pm - 4:00 pm   CONCURRENT SESSIONS

Title: LGBTQ Adolescence and Social Change: A Developmental Collision

Location: Baltimore Convention Center, Room 307

Stephen Russell is Priscilla Pond Flawn Regents Professor in Child Development chair of the Department of Human Development and Family Sciences at the University of Texas at Austin. He is an expert in adolescent and young adult health, with a focus on sexual orientation and gender identity. He is on the Board of Directors of the Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States (SIECUS), a fellow and former Board member of the National Council on Family Relations, an elected member of the International Academy of Sexuality Research, and was President of the Society for Research on Adolescence. He was recently elected to the Governing Council of SRCD. Twitter: @StephnTRussell

Abstract: More than two decades of research documents disparities in health and wellbeing for LGBTQ or sexual and gender minority (SGM) youth; research in the last decade has directly traced these disparities to experiences of discrimination and stress. At the same time, there has been dramatic social change in visibility and social acceptance regarding the lives of sexual and gender minorities. Yet recent evidence from the developmental sciences points to paradoxical findings: in many cases there have been growing rather than shrinking health disparities. We suggest that there is a developmental collision between normative adolescent developmental processes and sexual minority youth identities and visibility.

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2:30 pm - 4:00 pm   Making Developmental Science More Open: Successes, Obstacles, and Solutions

Location: Baltimore Convention Center, Room 309

Open Science entails applying the principles of openness to the entire research process, including hypothesis generation, data collection, data analysis, data storage, peer review, and manuscript publication and distribution. This panel will discuss why fully embracing an Open Science approach is an important goal for developmental science.  Moreover, when it comes to achieving this goal, the panel will highlight areas of progress and identify remaining challenges as well as potential solutions to these challenges.

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Panelist

Karen E. Adolph is Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at New York University. She leads the Databrary.org and PLAY (Play and Learning Across a Year) projects to enable open sharing and reuse of research video, and she maintains the Datavyu.org video-coding tool. Adolph received a B.A. from Sarah Lawrence College and Ph.D. from Emory University, and completed a postdoctoral fellowship at Albert Einstein College of Medicine. She is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association and Association for Psychological Science and Past-President of the International Congress on Infant Studies. She received the Kurt Koffka Medal, a Cattell Sabbatical Award, the Fantz Memorial Award, the Boyd McCandless Award, the ICIS Young Investigator Award, FIRST and MERIT awards from NICHD, and five teaching awards from NYU. She chaired the MSFR NIH study section and serves on the McDonnell Foundation advisory board. Adolph has published 155+ articles and chapters on perceptual-motor development.

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Panelist

John Colombo received his Ph.D. in 1981 from the University of Buffalo, and after 6 years as a research associate at the University of Kansas, he joined the Kansas faculty in 1988.  He has served as a department chair and associate dean; since 2007 has led the Schiefelbusch Institute for Life Span Studies and the NIH-funded Kansas Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center. He has served as Interim Vice Chancellor for Research since 2017.  He is a member of the Brain, Behavior, and Quantitative Program in Psychology and is affiliated with interdisciplinary doctoral programs in Child Language, Clinical Child Psychology and Neuroscience.  Over his career his work has been funded by NIH, NSF, and industry sources, and has published over 120 articles, written over 20 chapters, and authored or edited 5 books. He was an Associate Editor for Child Development (2006-2013) and Editor of Infancy (2013-2019). Twitter: @johncolombo_ks

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Panelist

Pamela E. Davis-Kean is Professor of Psychology and Research Professor at the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan where she is the Director of the Population, Neurodevelopment, and Genetics Program. Her research focuses on the various pathways that the socio-economic status (SES) of parents relates to the cognitive/achievement development of their children through parenting behaviors in the home environment. Dr. Davis-Kean's broader research agenda examines how both the micro (brain and biology) and macro (family and socioeconomic conditions) aspects of development relate to cognitive changes in children across the lifespan. She is also a methodologist and an advocate for open and replicated science in psychology. Twitter: @pdakean

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Panelist

Brian MacWhinney is Professor of Psychology, Computational Linguistics, and Modern Languages at Carnegie Mellon University. He has developed a model of first and second language processing and acquisition based on competition between item-based patterns. In 1984, he and Catherine Snow co-founded the CHILDES (Child Language Data Exchange System) Project for the computational study of child language transcript data. This system has extended to 13 additional research areas in the form of the TalkBank Project. MacWhinney’s recent work includes studies of online learning of second language vocabulary and grammar, neural network modeling of lexical development, fMRI studies of children with focal brain lesions, and ERP studies of between-language competition. He is also exploring the role of grammatical constructions in the marking of perspective shifting and the construction of mental models in scientific reasoning.

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Moderator

Justin Jager is an Assistant Professor within the T. Denny Sanford School of Social and Family Dynamics at Arizona State University.  He earned his Ph.D. in developmental psychology from the University of Michigan. Dr. Jager’s research, which is supported by NIAAA, NIDA, and NIMHD, is primarily devoted to unpacking how complex person-context interactions inform substance use/abuse and mental health across developmental and historical time.  Dr. Jager serves on the editorial boards of American Psychologist, Developmental Psychology, and Parenting: Science and Practice, is the current chair of SRA’s Finance Committee, and was co-chair and co-organizer of SRCD’s 2018 special topic meeting DEVSEC: Conference on the Use of Secondary and Open Source Data in Developmental Science.

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